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    University of Southern California
   
 
  Sep 22, 2017
 
 
    
USC Catalogue 2017-2018

USC School of Cinematic Arts


 

USC School of Cinematic Arts students shoot "The Films of Avi Krum," written and directed by Nick Musurca '12.​ Photo by Jeanne Jo, PhD candidate, Media Arts and Practice.

 

 


Departments

 

The USC School of Cinematic Arts (SCA) is one of the nation's preeminent centers for the creation, study, research and development of film, television and interactive media. With nearly 200,000 square feet of facilities, the school confers degrees ranging from the bachelor's to the doctorate. SCA is composed of seven divisions: the John C. Hench Division of Animation and Digital Arts; the Bryan Singer Division of Cinema and Media Studies; Film and Television Production; Interactive Media and Games; Peter Stark Producing Program; the John Wells Division of Writing for Screen and Television; and Media Arts and Practice. The school also has two organized research units — the Institute for Multimedia Literacy and the Entertainment Technology Center.

Since its founding in 1929 as the first course of study in film at any college or university in the United States, USC's cinema program has consistently set academic and professional standards for excellence. In addition, the school has a record-breaking number of endowed chairs in the discipline; production facilities that rival industry counterparts and extraordinary faculty and staff.

Thanks to SCA's location in Los Angeles, students have access to the country's leading film, television, animation and video game producers; world-class literary and talent agencies; libraries and archives brimming with research materials; and alumni that support the school and the men and women in its academic body. The school is also home to USC's Trojan Vision television station.

The USC School of Cinematic Arts recognizes that a student can only truly excel in his or her chosen area of expertise after exposure to all elements of the art form. Consequently, there is an emphasis on cross-disciplinary course work that ensures writers get behind the camera; cinema and media studies scholars edit footage; and production majors examine the canon from a rigorous academic perspective.

Administration

Elizabeth M. Daley, PhD, Dean

Akira Mizuta Lippit, PhD, Vice Dean of Faculty

Michael Renov, PhD, Vice Dean, Academic Affairs

Scott S. Fisher, MS, Associate Dean, Research

Office of Student Services
Brian Harke, EdD, Dean of Students
(213) 740-8358
Email: admissions@cinema.usc.edu; studentaffairs@cinema.usc.edu
cinema.usc.edu

The John C. Hench Division of Animation and Digital Arts
Michael Renov, Interim Chair
School of Cinematic Arts — Building B 210
(213) 740-3986*
FAX: (213) 740-5869

The Bryan Singer Division of Cinema and Media Studies
Aniko Imre, Division Chair
School of Cinematic Arts 320
(213) 740-3334*

Film and Television Production
Michael Fink, Division Chair
School of Cinematic Arts 434
(213) 740-3317*

Interactive Media and Games Division
Danny Bilson, Division Chair
SCI 201M
(213) 821-4472*
FAX: (213) 821-2665

Media Arts and Practice
Holly Willis, Division Chair
School of Cinematic Arts — Building I 101
(213) 821-5700*

The Peter Stark Producing Program
Lawrence Turman, Division Chair
School of Cinematic Arts 366
(213) 740-3304
FAX: (213) 745-6652

The John Wells Division of Writing for Screen and Television
Jack Epps Jr., Division Chair
School of Cinematic Arts 335
(213) 740-3303*
FAX: (213) 740-8035

Summer Program
David Weitzner, Division Chair
School of Cinematic Arts 250
(213) 740-3327*

*For information regarding admission, call (213) 740-8358.

Faculty

Steven J. Ross/Time Warner Endowed Dean's Chair in Cinema-Television: Elizabeth M. Daley, PhD

Dana and Albert "Cubby" Broccoli Endowed Chair in Producing: John Watson, MA

The Larry Auerbach Endowed Chair: Larry Auerbach

The Mark Burnett Summer Program Endowed Chair: David Weitzner, BA

The Joseph Campbell Endowed Chair in Cinematic Ethics: Theodore Braun, MFA

The Sergei Eisenstein Endowed Chair in Cinematic Design: Bruce A. Block, MFA

Electronic Arts Endowed Chair in Interactive Entertainment: Tracy Fullerton, MFA

Conrad Hall Chair in Cinematography and Color Timing: Judy Irola

Alma and Alfred Hitchcock Chair for the Study of American Film: Drew Casper, PhD

The Michael Kahn Endowed Chair in Editing: Nancy Forner, BA

The Mona and Bernard Kantor Endowed Chair in Production: Mark J. Harris, BA

The Kortschak Family Endowed Division Chair in Film and Television Production: Michael Fink, MFA

The George Méliès Endowed Chair in Visual Effects: Michael Fink, MFA

William Cameron Menzies Endowed Chair in Production Design: Alex McDowell, BFA

Stephen K. Nenno Endowed Chair in Television Studies: Ellen Seiter, PhD

Jack Oakie Chair in Comedy: Jack Epps Jr., BA

Mary Pickford Foundation Endowed Chair: Doe Mayer, MA

The Katherine and Frank Price Endowed Chair for the Study of Race and Popular Culture: Todd Boyd, PhD

Kay Rose Endowed Chair in the Art of Sound and Dialogue Editing: Midge Costin, MA

Fran and Ray Stark Endowed Chair for the Study of American Film: Lawrence Turman, BA

Charles S. Swartz Endowed Chair in Entertainment Technology: Richard Weinberg, PhD

The T.C. Wang Family Endowed Chair in Cinematic Arts: Akira Mizuta Lippit, PhD

The Haskell Wexler Endowed Chair in Documentary: Michael Renov, PhD

The Robin Williams Endowed Chair in Comedy: Barnet Kellman, PhD

Dino and Martha De Laurentiis Endowed Professorship: Mary Sweeney, MA

Microsoft Endowed Professorship: Dennis Wixon, PhD

Presidential Professor of Cinematic Arts: George Lucas, BA

Judge Widney Professor: Robert Zemeckis

Provost Professor of Communication, Journalism, and Cinematic Arts: Henry Jenkins, PhD

Distinguished Professor: Mark J. Harris, BA

Professors: Bruce Block, MFA; Don Bohlinger, MFA; Mark Bolas, MS; Todd Boyd, PhD; Drew Casper, PhD; Elizabeth M. Daley, PhD; Jack Epps Jr., BA; Michael Fink, MFA; Scott S. Fisher, MS; Tracy Fullerton, MFA; Norman Hollyn, BA; David Howard, MFA; Aniko Imre, PhD; Judy Irola; David Isaacs, BA; David James, PhD; Henry Jenkins, PhD;  Robert Jones; Jeremy Kagan, MFA; Gail Katz, MBA; Barnet Kellman, PhD; Akira Lippit, PhD; Doe Mayer, MA; Tara McPherson, PhD; Christine Panushka, MFA; Michael Peyser, BA; Amanda Pope, BA; Michael Renov, PhD; Howard A. Rodman, BA; Ellen Seiter, PhD; Tom Sito, BFA; Sheila M. Sofian, MFA; Michael Taylor, BA; Lawrence Turman, BA; John Watson, MA

Associate Professors: Tom Abrams, MFA; Ted Braun, MFA; Linda Brown, MFA; J. D. Connor, PhD; Midge Costin, MA; Pamela Douglas, MA; Nitin Govil, PhD; Helaine Head, BA; Priya Jaikumar, PhD; Georgia Jeffries, BA; Kara Keeling, PhD; Richard Lemarchand, BA; Everett Lewis, MFA; Laura Isabel Serna, PhD; Kathy Smith, BA; Peter Sollett, BFA; Mary Sweeney, MA; Dennis Wixon, PhD

Assistant Professors: Andreas Kratky, PhD; Jeff Watson, PhD

Professors of Practice: David Balkan, BA; Jed Dannenbaum, PhD; Stephen Flick, BA; Pablo Frasconi, BFA; Brenda Goodman, BS; Don Hall, BA; Alexander McDowell, BFA; Barbara Nance, BA; Michael Patterson, BFA; William Yahraus, MA

Associate Professors of Practice: Christine Acham, PhD; Steve Albrezzi, BA; Kiki Benzon, PhD; Vicki Callahan, PhD; Christopher Chomyn, MFA; Reine-Claire Dousarkissian, MA; Nancy Forner, BA; Eric Hanson, BA; Virginia Kuhn, PhD; Elisabeth Mann, MFA; Thomas Miller, MD, MFA; Angelo Pacifici, BArch; Michael Provart, MFA; Candace Reckinger, MFA; John Rosenberg, MFA; Mark Shepherd, MFA; Peter Sollett, BFA; Jason Squire, MA; Michael Uno, MFA; Jennifer Warren, BA; Shelly Wattenbarger, MFA; David Weber; Tristan Whitman, MFA

Assistant Professors of Practice: Michael Bodie, MFA; Peter Brinson, MFA; Evan Hughes, MA; DJ Johnson, MFA; Angela Jones, BFA; Robert Kositchek, BFA; Margaret Moser, MFA; Maks Naporowski, BA; Gabriel Peters-Lazaro, PhD

Research Professors: Larry Auerbach; Richard Weinberg, PhD; Holly Willis, PhD

Research Assistant Professors: Marientina Gotsis, MFA; Jennifer Stein, PhD

Visiting Professors: Danny Bilson, BA; Lisa Leeman, BA; Robert Townsend

Visiting Associate Professor: Elizabeth Allen Rosenbaum, MFA

Instructor of Cinema Practice: Richard Burton, BA

Part-time Faculty: Ioan Allen; Kate Amend; Tom Anderson; Wendy Apple; Harold Apter; Larissa Bank; David Baron; Deborah Baron; Craig Barron; Janet Batchler; David Bazelon; Irving Belateche; Diego Berdakin; Sandra Berg; Alan Berger; Fred Bernstein; Mitch Block; John Bowman; Elizabeth Brauer; John Brennan; Paul Bricault; Musa Brooker; Michael Broukhim; Robert Brown; Bonnie Bruckheimer; Robert Buerkle; Bobette Buster; Ed Callahan; Trey Callaway; Will Carter; Michael Cassutt; Ramiro Cazaux; Bonnie Chi; Peter Chung; David Clawson; Jacque Cofer-Edmonds; Akela Cooper; Ken Cosby; Tim Curnen; Martin Daniel; Kristen W. Davis; Paul DeMeo;  Dariush Derakhshani; Heather Desurvire; Vincent Diamante; Sharon Doyle; Frederic Durand; James Egan; Peter Exline; David Fain; Siavash Farahani; Ron Fernandez; Paul Foley; Bonnie Garvin; Lance Gentile; Andrew Given; David Goetsch; Eric Goldberg; Richard Goldsmith; Janet Graham-Borba; Amanda Green; Sharon Greene; Jeffrey Hammer; Chevon Hicks; John Hight; Perry Hoberman; Joe Hoffman; Todd Hoffman; Michael Hoggan; Sean Hood; Caroline Hu; Joan Hyler; Peter Kang; Aaron Kaplan; Thomas Kemper; Liz Keyishian; Randal Kleiser; Richard Kletter; Michael Kontopoulos; Jeffrey Korchek; Stu Krieger; Jon Kroll; Lucas Kuzma; Michael Lane; Clifford Latimer; Ken LaZebnik; Ed Lee; Robert Levin; Andrew Licht; David Lloyd; John Mahoney; Laird Malamed; Leonard Maltin; Peter Marx; Frank McAdams; Jim McGinn; Denise McKenna; Bill Mechanic; Lou Morton; Robert Nashak; Rob Nederhorst; Noel Nosseck; Jim O'Keeffe; Joseph Olin; Bob Osher; Rick Parks; Joe Peracchio; Rod Perth; Brian Peterson; Wendy Phillips; Anne Postman; Kate Powers; Bill Prady; Robert Ramsey; Gary Randall; Sandy Reisenbach; Vincent Robert; Peter Robinson; Howard Rosenberg; Mike Saltzman; Julie Sayres; Nevin Schreiner; Debby Seibel; Bobby Smith, Jr.; Bethany Sparks; Jim Staahl; Noah Stern; Sean Stewart; Jeffrey Stott; Mark Stratton; Scott Sturgeon; Danny Sussman; Neely Swanson; Ella Taylor; Aaron Thomas; John Underkoffler; Marcel Valcarce; Pam Veasey; Jon Wagner; Dahvi Waller; Jordan Weisman; David Weitzner; William Whittington; Tyger Williams; Chase Winton; Russ Woody; Frank Wuliger; Maureen Yeager; Laura Yilmaz; Gil Zimmerman

Emeritus Professors: Ron Curfman, MFA; Trevor Greenwood, MA; Richard Harber, MA; Richard Jewell, PhD; Edward Kaufman, PhD; Marsha Kinder, PhD; K. Kenneth Miura, MA; Woody Omens, MA; Morton Zarcoff, MA

Degree Programs

The USC School of Cinematic Arts offers professional and academic degree programs at the bachelor's, master's and doctoral levels.

Bachelor of Arts — Animation and Digital Arts

This program combines a broad liberal arts background with specialization in a profession. The degree is granted through the USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences in conjunction with the School of Cinematic Arts. The degree requires 128 units. For more information, see here .

Bachelor of Arts, Cinema and Media Studies 

This degree is granted through the USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences in conjunction with the School of Cinematic Arts and requires 128 units. For more information, see here .

Bachelor of Arts, Cinematic Arts, Film and Television Production

This degree is a two-year program for transfer students. The BA is granted through the USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences in conjunction with the School of Cinematic Arts and requires 128 units. For more information, see here .

Bachelor of Fine Arts, Cinematic Arts, Film and Television Production

This degree is a four-year program only available to incoming freshmen. The BFA in Cinematic Arts, Film and Television Production is granted through the School of Cinematic Arts and requires 128 units. For more information, see here .

Bachelor of Arts — Interactive Entertainment

Dedicated to immersive experience design and emerging technologies, this program is for students who are driven to innovate at the intersection of traditional media, games, and whatever happens next. The Bachelor of Arts in Interactive Entertainment is granted through the USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences in conjunction with the School of Cinematic Arts. The degree requires 128 units. For more information, see here .

Bachelor of Arts — Media Arts and Practice

This program is for students who want to harness the power of digital storytelling and media design to communicate across diverse fields beyond the entertainment industry. This degree is granted through the USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences in conjunction with the School of Cinematic Arts. The degree requires 128 units. For more information, see here .

Bachelor of Fine Arts — Writing for Screen and Television

This is a unique program designed for students who wish to receive intensive training for non-fiction and fiction writing for screen and television. The BFA in Writing for Screen and Television is granted through the School of Cinematic Arts. The degree requires 128 units. For more information, see here .

Bachelor of Science in Business Administration (Cinematic Arts)

This program offers a unique coupling of the USC Marshall School of Business and the School of Cinematic Arts in a four-year interdisciplinary degree. In addition to the Marshall School of Business core classes, the students will also take a total of 24 units from the School of Cinematic Arts. This competitive program is offered to freshmen admitted to the Marshall School of Business as Business Scholars. Upon completion of all requirements, students will receive a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration (Cinematic Arts). See the Marshall School of Business  for course requirements.

Master of Arts, Cinema and Media Studies 

This degree is granted by the USC Graduate School in conjunction with the School of Cinematic Arts. This program requires 36 units. For more information, see here .

Master of Arts, Cinematic Arts (Media Arts, Games and Health)

This program requires 36 units. For more information, see here .

Master of Fine Arts, Cinematic Arts, Film and Television Production

This professional degree requires 52 units. For more information, see here .

Master of Fine Arts, Writing for Screen and Television

This program requires 44 units. For more information, see here .

Master of Fine Arts, Animation and Digital Arts

This program requires 50 units. For more information, see here .

Master of Fine Arts, Interactive Media

This program requires 50 units. For more information, see here .

Master of Fine Arts, Interactive Media (Games and Health)

This program requires 50 units. For more information, see here . 

Master of Fine Arts, Producing for Film, Television, and New Media

The Peter Stark Producing Program requires 44 units. For more information, see here .

Doctor of Philosophy, Cinema and Media Studies 

The PhD is based on a program of study and research culminating in the completion of a dissertation in the major field of study. A minimum of 68 semester units (exclusive of dissertation registration) beyond the baccalaureate is required. Applicants who have completed a Bachelor of Arts or Master of Arts degree in Cinematic Arts, or a closely related field, may apply to the PhD program. The doctoral degree is granted by the Graduate School in conjunction with the School of Cinematic Arts. For more information, see here .

Doctor of Philosophy, Cinematic Arts (Media Arts and Practice)

The PhD in Media Arts and Practice program offers a rigorous and creative environment for scholarly innovation as students explore the intersection of design, media and critical thinking while defining new modes of research and scholarship for the 21st century. Core to the program is its transdisciplinary ethos; after completing foundational course work, students design their own curricula, drawing on expertise across all divisions and research labs within the School of Cinematic Arts. The doctoral degree is granted by the Graduate School in conjunction with the School of Cinematic Arts. For more information, see here .

Writing for Screen and Television Certificate

The Writing for Screen and Television Certificate provides an established writer, domestic or international, with a one-year program of study. It is meant to accommodate a writer who has already attained significant recognition and would like to learn the craft of screenwriting. Sixteen units are required. For more information, see here .

Graduate Certificate in the Business of Entertainment

This certificate program provides graduate-level education in various aspects of the business of film, television and new media. It requires 16 units. For more information, see here .

Graduate Certificate in Cinematic Arts Archiving and Preservation

This certificate program is designed specifically for students and practitioners who want to use their education and skills for advancing the knowledge of film, television and interactive media through the preservation and dissemination of the historical artifacts that form the underpinnings of scholarship in the performing arts.  Through this program, students will gain the knowledge, tools and skills necessary to preserve the materials that make up the history of entertainment and to lead scholars through the research maze to the completion of books or media in their fields of study. This certificate requires 12 units.  For more information, see here .

Graduate Certificate in Digital Media and Culture

This certificate program is for graduate students from across the USC campus who want to explore the shifting nature of scholarly expression, pedagogical practice and research in the 21st century. It combines seminars with hands-on, lab-based workshops devoted to basic image manipulation, video editing, social media and Web design to facilitate sophisticated critical thinking and practice in and through multimedia. The program requires 12 units. For more information, see here .

General Requirements

Acceptance of Transfer Units

The School of Cinematic Arts does not accept courses taken in film and/or television production at other institutions to fulfill degree and minor requirements. Basic film or television history courses can sometimes be accepted for transfer credit.

No transfer credit will be accepted in lieu of CTPR 290 , CTPR 294 , CTPR 295 , CTPR 310 , CTPR 507  and CTPR 508  and any advanced production courses.

No transfer credits are accepted for the Peter Stark producing track, the graduate programs in animation and digital arts, screenwriting and interactive media.

Transfer policy for the PhD requires advisement and approval of the division chair.

Waiver of Course Requirements

Under special circumstances waivers and substitutions are granted; check with the Cinematic Arts Office of Student Affairs. All course waivers and substitutions must be approved by the associate dean of academic affairs.

The following courses cannot be waived for students majoring in Film and Television Production: CTIN 584a , CTIN 584b , CTIN 584c , CTIN 584z , CTPR 290 , CTPR 294 , CTPR 295 , CTPR 310 , CTPR 480 , CTPR 507 , CTPR 508 , CTPR 546L , CTPR 547L , CTPR 581a , CTPR 581b , CTPR 581c , CTPR 581z , CTPR 582a , CTPR 582b , CTPR 582z , CTPR 583 , CTPR 587a , CTPR 587b , CTPR 587c , CTPR 587z .

Student Advisement

Each program has its own advisement system. Check with the program administrator or with the Cinematic Arts Office of Student Affairs. Cinematic Arts student affairs counselors are available to answer questions about degree programs, grades, advisement and other matters.

Grade Point Average Requirements

A minimum grade of C, 2.0 (A = 4.0), must be earned in all required and prerequisite courses in order to progress to the next course level. Students may attempt to improve a grade lower than a C (2.0) only one time by registering and retaking the specific course. Departmental approval is required in order to retake a School of Cinematic Arts course.

In addition, a minimum grade point average must be achieved to earn all cinematic arts degrees (see the individual program descriptions). For example, undergraduates and graduates must earn a minimum grade of C (2.0) in all required cinematic arts courses. However, graduate students must also achieve a B (3.0) average in all courses required for the degree.

Undergraduate students in the film and television production program who achieve a grade lower than a C (2.0) in CTPR 290  (BFA only), CTPR 294 , CTPR 295  or CTPR 310 , and graduate students in the production program who earn a grade lower than a C (2.0) in CTPR 507  or CTPR 508  may petition to retake the required sequence only once. Permission to retake any prerequisite or core production courses requires prior departmental committee approval.

Students who do not satisfy the degree requirement after repeating a class will be disqualified from the program.

Tuition and Fees (Estimated)

Students in the School of Cinematic Arts' graduate programs pay differential tuition (see the Tuition and Fees  section for current tuition rates). Undergraduate programs are assessed the university-wide tuition rate. In addition, some classes are charged lab fees, as noted in the Schedule of Classes, and insurance fees. The university reserves the right to assess new fees or charges. The rates listed are subject to change without notice by action of the Board of Trustees.

Honors, Minors, International Programs and Summer Program

Honors in Multimedia Scholarship

Honors in Multimedia Scholarship is a dynamic and innovative honors program for undergraduates in all majors across the USC campus. Students learn to shoot and edit videos, use professional design applications, code web-based media, and explore emerging genres of storytelling. They also learn new approaches to the production of knowledge through the critical application of digital media. Students earn the Honors designation by completing a minimum of 24 units of required course work culminating in a capstone thesis during their final year. For more information, see here .

Minor in Animation and Digital Arts

The minor in animation offers students an introduction to the theory and practice of animation, including its relationship to the history of art and cinema, creative writing, and basic film production. It provides students with an opportunity to create both personal and collaborative work in a wide range of genres, from traditional character to contemporary experimental and computer animation. The program requires 24 units. For more information, see here .

Minor in Cinematic Arts

A minor in cinematic arts is available to USC undergraduate students in all schools and departments. The minor provides the opportunity for students to become familiar with various aspects of media study. The program requires 20 units. For more information, see here .

Minor in Comedy

The minor in comedy is designed to train students in the creation of comedic entertainment in film, television and new media. The program utilizes both analysis courses and creative workshops to train students in comedic theory and practice. Through elective choices students may focus their studies on a number of cinematic disciplines as they pertain to the creation of comedic content, including writing sit-coms, directing comedic actors and producing sketch comedy. The program requires 16 units. For more information, see here .

Minor in Digital Studies

The minor in digital studies explores the rich potential of digital media for critical analysis and creative discovery. Learning the exciting and dynamic potential of a broad array of tools and technologies, students create innovative projects, from photo essays to Web-based documentaries, from interactive videos to sophisticated Websites, and from typography in motion to 3-D visualizations. The program requires 20 units. For more information, see here .

Minor in Entertainment Industry

The minor in entertainment industry provides students interested in media content creation with a focused curriculum that will give them insight into the economic factors and professional practices that influence the creative process, and how they interact with social, historical, technical and aesthetic elements. For more information, see here .

Minor in Future Cinema

The minor in Future Cinema explores the frontier of audiovisual storytelling building on the cutting edge research within the School of Cinematic Arts. Students will explore the creative and technological transformations of an industry in transition as cinema becomes live, playable, immersive, mobile, virtual, crowdsourced and more. The program requires 20 units. For more information see here .

Minor in Game Animation

The skills of the modern animator, visual effects artist, motion capture professional and many others are of great value in the games industry when paired with an understanding of how these assets can be used in games and systems. The game animation minor provides an educational path that teaches both systems thinking and the skills and creativity of an animator. The program requires 24 units. For more information, see here .

Minor in Game Audio

Game audio professionals must not only be competent in one area (e.g., expressly in music composing or in audio recording), but also in other areas of audio and in theories of procedurality and interaction. This minor provides a grounding in game design and systems thinking, while providing a theoretical backing and skills in audio design and composition to prepare students to design successful audio for the games industry. The program requires 24 units. For more information, see here .

Minor in Game Design

Design for games is a young, exciting field applicable to media artists working all over the world, in different aspects of the industry and with many different tools. The game design minor teaches basic iterative design and prototyping skills while providing students the opportunity to explore design for new technologies and the skills of user assessment and usability testing. The program requires 24 units. For more information, see here .

Minor in Game Entrepreneurism

The modern media, technology and entertainment fields are built on the backs of new businesses and new ideas. To start a successful business, you need skills and knowledge of the processes for setting up a business, finding investment and turning your creative project from prototype to finished project. The game entrepreneurism minor provides an educational path that teaches hard business thinking for creative entrepreneurs. The program requires 24 units. For more information, see here .

Minor in Game Studies

Games are a major cultural form, with game sales now exceeding box office revenue in the United States. Attention to games and interactive media is growing, and it has become necessary to understand them as meaningful systems, reflect on their cultural influence, and to help guide their evolution with insightful criticism. The game studies minor prepares students with fundamental underpinnings in media criticism and games. For more information, see here .

Minor in Game User Research

Game and interaction design are deeply dependent upon human-computer interaction and the ability to use research methods to improve player experience. This minor is designed to give students an underpinning in game design, interface design and research methods, while teaching a full set of skills for playtesting and usability practice. The program requires 24 units. For more information, see here .

Minor in Immersive Media

The minor in immersive media is designed to train students to create projects in virtual reality, augmented reality, and other immersive media formats. The core program requirements provide the solid fundamentals needed to understand, conceive of, and create immersive work. Through elective choices students may focus their studies on theory, on specific fields of immersive, on creative expression, or on building technology. The program requires 24 units. For more information, see here .

Minor in Media and Social Change

The minor in media and social change provides the opportunity for students who are interested in media content creation and research to take classes in a focused curriculum on the various aspects of media for change. Students will gain insight into the professional practices of creating media content, analyzing existing content, and learning how they can influence the future by integrating social issues into the work they are doing in related fields. The program requires 22 units. For more information, see here .

Minor in Science Visualization

The minor in science visualization offers an introduction to science visualization methodology and practice focused in an area of relevant research. The minor is structured to provide the skills and knowledge needed in science visualization, and will culminate in a capstone project under the close supervision of faculty in both animation and science. The program requires 16 units. For more information, see here .

Minor in Screenwriting

The minor in screenwriting provides thorough training in the craft of writing for screen and television. Students learn the fundamentals of character, conflict and scene structure and build on their skills through each course as they write feature and television scripts in all genres and explore areas of their interest. Students may apply in the spring or fall semester. The program requires 16 units. For more information, see here .

Minor in Themed Entertainment

From cruise ships to casinos to immersive educational retreats, themed entertainment design involves submerging a real, live human being into a story in a truly robust, physical way. As new tools for entertainment and education develop, they continually push toward enabling players to completely become the heroes and heroines of their own stories. The themed entertainment minor focuses on history, theory and skills of themed entertainment design. The program requires 24 units. For more information, see here .

Minor in 3-D Animation in Cinematic Arts

The minor in 3-D animation in cinematic arts offers an introduction to basic animation principles and history, as well as creative and skill-based instruction in 3-D computer animation. Through elective choices students may focus their studies on their specific area of interest, including visual effects, motion capture, virtual reality, modeling, or character animation. The program requires 16 units. For more information, see here .

Minor in Cinema-Television for the Health Professions

This 24-unit minor is designed for students who plan to enter careers or professional programs in medicine after graduation and are interested in working with film and television producers to disseminate accurate health information to the public. See the Keck School of Medicine of USC  for course requirements.

Minor in 2-D Art for Games

This interdisciplinary minor integrates three major disciplines (fine arts, computer science and interactive media) to develop the 2-D visual skills necessary to conceptualize and illustrate images for games. For more information, see USC Roski School of Art and Design .

Minor in 3-D Art for Games

The focus of the 3-D Art for Games minor is a trans-disciplinary approach that incorporates the creative, technological and team-based communication skills necessary to develop 3-D art skills for video games. For more information, see USC Roski School of Art and Design .

Minor in Video Game Design and Management

The video game design minor integrates theoretical concepts and practical skills to prepare students for a career in interactive entertainment, specifically the video game industry. Through integration of two major disciplines (cinematic arts and information technology), students will be exposed to a variety of design concepts related to creating video games. See the Information Technology Program  for course requirements. For specific information on admission and application procedures, contact the School of Cinematic Arts at (213) 821-2515 or the Information Technology Program at (213) 740-4542.

Minor in Performing Arts Studies

The minor in Performing Arts provides an interdisciplinary inquiry into the nature and aesthetics of the performing arts. It combines the disciplines of cinematic arts, dance, music and theatre. The minor is a unique course of study that looks at how the performing arts contribute to a culturally literate society. See USC School of Dramatic Arts  for requirements.

 

International Programs

Studio Arts Center International

John C. Hench Animation and Digital Arts and the Division of Media Arts and Practice jointly offer, with the Roski School of Art and Design, a fall semester abroad at Studio Art Centers International (SACI) in Florence, Italy. Undergraduate students will be required to take equivalent classes in animation and media arts while also benefiting from the wide range of liberal arts courses offered at SACI.

Global Exchange Workshop

"Documenting the Global City: Los Angeles and Beijing," is an intensive, seven-week workshop in documentary filming that pairs graduate students from the USC School of Cinematic Arts and the Communication University of China (CUC) to make short documentaries on Los Angeles or Beijing as global cities. The program is held in Los Angeles or Beijing in alternate years. It will be held in Beijing in summer 2018. Participating students enroll in CTPR 515 Global Exchange Workshop  (2 units).

With faculty guidance from both universities, the students must negotiate cultural differences both in front of and behind the camera. In the process, both students and faculty directly experience the other culture and learn how it defines globalism in general, sees its own city in global terms, combines theory and practice, and processes a new set of perceptions and lived experience.

Interested students should contact Professor Mark Harris of the division of Film and Video Production at (213) 740-3319, or at mharris@cinema.usc.edu. Airfare to China and lodging expenses in Beijing are provided for all students accepted into the course.

Summer Program

The USC School of Cinematic Arts Summer Program is a six-week program that offers classes from different facets of the entertainment industry. Participants from around the world have an opportunity to attend intensive, creatively demanding and satisfying filmmaking courses.

Programs

Minor

University Certificate