University of Southern California

Marshall School of Business

Undergraduate Degrees

Bachelor of Science

The business administration major combines a strong grounding in business fundamentals and expertise in select functional areas with extensive exposure to the liberal arts. The curriculum is designed with significant flexibility so that students can complement their studies in business with a minor in a field outside business.

Marshall School programs lead to a Bachelor of Science degree; the most common major is Business Administration. Marshall students may major in Accounting through the Leventhal School of Accounting (part of the Marshall School).

The Marshall School offers two emphasis programs: the program with the School of Cinematic Arts leads to a B.S. in Business Administration with an emphasis in Cinematic Arts; and the program with the School of International Relations leads to a B.S. in Business Administration with an emphasis in International Relations. The Marshall School and USC Viterbi School of Engineering offer a combined degree program leading to a B.S. in Business Administration/Computer Science; this degree is administered by the Viterbi School of Engineering. Students in the B.S. in Business Administration (World Program) earn bachelor’s degrees from USC, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) and Bocconi University (Milan, Italy). The Marshall School also offers a variety of minors for non-business students.

Admission

Students may be admitted to the program as incoming freshmen, as students transferring from another college or university, or as USC undergraduates transferring from another major. Admission to the Marshall School requires admission to the university and depends on academic performance, particularly in quantitative areas. USC students who have not been admitted to the major or a minor in the Marshall School may complete a maximum of 12 units from the Marshall School and/or the Leventhal School. Information and guidelines for students applying to USC Marshall as freshmen and those transferring to USC from another university are available at the USC Undergraduate Admission and USC Marshall Undergraduate Admissions Websites; information and guidelines for USC undergraduates who wish to transfer to Marshall from another major at USC can be found on the Marshall Undergraduate Advising Website.

Degree Requirements

Educational Objectives

The undergraduate programs in business administration have three main goals: (1) graduates will have a grounding in skills and concepts that are fundamental to business; (2) graduates will have deep expertise in one or more specific areas of business, selected according to the student’s personal and professional goals and objectives; and (3) graduates will have extensive exposure to the liberal arts, usually with a formal minor in a field outside business.

USC Core Requirements

All undergraduates take the USC Core, comprising general education, the writing program and the diversity requirement. The general education program requires six courses in different categories. The writing program requires two courses, WRIT 150 and WRIT 340. The diversity requirement is met by passing any course with the “m” designation. See The USC Core page and the General Education Program page for more information.

Business Core Requirements

Business Administration majors must complete the business core. The business core contains foundational courses that provide analytical skills and theoretical knowledge in math, statistics, accounting and business economics as well as communication skills pertinent to the business field; functional courses in business disciplines such as finance, marketing, organizational behavior and operations; and integrative courses in strategy and data analysis.

BUSINESS CORE COURSES UNITS
BUAD 285ab Accounting Fundamentals, Financial and Managerial Accounting (4-2), or
BUAD 286ab Accounting Fundamentals, Managerial and Financial Accounting (4-2) 6
BUAD 302 Communication Strategy in Business 4
BUAD 304 Organizational Behavior and Leadership 4
BUAD 306 Business Finance 4
BUAD 307 Marketing Fundamentals 4
BUAD 310 Applied Business Statistics 4
BUAD 311 Operations Management 4
BUAD 425 Data Analysis for Decision Making 2
BUAD 497 Strategic Management 4
ECON 351x Microeconomics for Business 4
ECON 352x Macroeconomics for Business 4
MATH 118x* Fundamental Principles of the Calculus, or
MATH 125** Calculus I 4
*Placement into MATH 118x is contingent on successful completion of MATH 117 or obtaining an acceptable score on the math placement exam or AP calculus or IB mathematics exam. The MATH 118x requirement may be waived with an AP Calculus AB or BC score of 4 or higher or an IB math score of 5 or higher.

**A-level mathematics examination scores of A or B may receive subject credit for MATH 125. Eligible students should speak with their academic advisers for additional information.

Business Electives Requirement

In addition to business core courses, students are required to gain a deeper understanding of a specific aspect of business in which they have an interest. Business administration majors must complete 12 units of upper-division elective courses (typically three 4-unit courses) offered by the Marshall School, specifically 300- or 400-level courses with a prefix ACCT, BAEP, BUCO, FBE, FIM, IOM or DSO, MKT or MOR. Students can also satisfy the business electives requirement through participation in a Marshall School sponsored international exchange program. FIM courses are open to students in the non-degree FIM certificate program.

Electives should be selected based on a student’s personal and professional goals and in consultation with an academic adviser. The Marshall School’s academic departments and centers can also help students select courses that are particularly useful for careers in fields covered by the department or center. Electives are normally clustered in a particular field, but may be spread across different fields.

Additional Requirements

Sixty units of non-business course work are required for any of the undergraduate degrees conferred by the Marshall School of Business.

A maximum of 24 units of undergraduate course work may be taken pass/no pass and used toward the B.S. degree in Business Administration. However, MATH 118x, WRIT 150, WRIT 340, ECON 351x, ECON 352x and all courses required for the major must be taken for a letter grade.

In addition to meeting university GPA requirements, a minimum overall/cumulative grade point average of 2.0 (A = 4.0) in upper-division business courses is required for graduation.

Free Electives

The business curriculum allows for 32 units of free electives. Students are strongly encouraged to pursue a minor, study a language and/or take advantage of the university’s many opportunities to study abroad.

Minors

USC offers more than 150 minors, spanning a wide variety of fields. The business curriculum is designed to allow every student enough flexibility to pursue a minor outside of business, in the belief that a strong undergraduate education must be well-rounded and incorporate the liberal arts as well as business classes. Minors allow students to gain substantial expertise in a field outside of business by taking classes in another of USC’s top-ranked departments and schools. Students with an officially declared minor may apply for the honor of being named a Renaissance Scholar if they meet the other program conditions.

Because some classes required for particular minors may have limited availability, students are encouraged to work closely with their academic advisers to develop plans for their minors. The Marshall Office of Undergraduate Advising can help plan for minors and provide information on the various minors offered throughout the university and how they complement different business tracks.

Marshall School Academic Departments and Centers

The Marshall School’s academic departments and centers listed and described below can help students select courses that are particularly useful for careers in the fields covered by the department or center.

Center for Management Communication

The center offers classes in a variety of topics relating to communication in organizations, ethics, business presentations, business writing, interpersonal interactions, group processes and teamwork, persuasion and leadership. The importance of effective communication to the success of business leaders and organizations has increased exponentially in the age of globalization, the Internet and instant media reporting that takes business news to the world in seconds. Communication theory, practice and skills will help students advance themselves and their organizations regardless of their positions or industries. Business leaders at all levels need the ability to communicate strategically in times of crisis or calm.

Department of Finance and Business Economics

The department offers classes in the fields of finance, business economics, business law and real estate. Subjects include microeconomics, macroeconomics, economic forecasting, corporate finance, investments and valuation, financial institutions and markets, risk management, and real estate finance, among others. These subjects are important for business planning and consulting, evaluation of capital investments and corporate strategies, and securities investment analysis, advising and trading.

Department of Data Sciences and Operations

The department offers classes in operations management, statistics and information systems. These three areas are critical to the success of any firm in a globalized economy: technology and information management, gathering and understanding data, and effective management of day-to-day operations. Students learn to leverage technology and information systems to gather critical market data on a global basis; use statistics to turn this data into critical forecasts and competitive analysis; and manage projects with international teams, develop innovative products, and skillfully manage the creation and delivery of goods and services to anywhere on the globe. Career opportunities in these areas include consulting, product development, supply chain management, global marketing and manufacturing. Course work in this department is especially important to students interested in entering technology fields.

Department of Management and Organization

The department offers classes in human resources, negotiations, organizational behavior and management strategy. The management function is concerned with setting corporate strategy to gain competitive advantage in a dynamic, global environment; designing the organization to implement the strategy; and leading organizational members to achieve strategic objectives. In carrying out their responsibilities, managers must balance the demands of the competitive environment with the resources and capabilities inside the organization. The department’s classes help students learn how to be effective managers by developing skills in team building, decision-making, strategy formulation, organizational design, motivating employees and human resource development.

Department of Marketing

Marketing is the process of planning and executing the conception, pricing, promotion and distribution of ideas, goods and services to create exchanges that satisfy individual and organizational objectives. Modern marketing stresses research and analysis to understand consumer behavior and to identify customer needs, new product research and development, competitive pricing, coordinated promotional or sales programs, and efficient logistics and distribution. Students interested in careers in marketing management, logistics management, retailing or wholesaling, sales program administration, advertising or marketing research will find courses in marketing valuable.

Lloyd Greif Center for Entrepreneurial Studies

The Greif Center offers a wide range of courses in entrepreneurship and a multiclass Entrepreneur Program designed for students who want to start or own a high-growth business, join an emerging business or participate in an entrepreneurial venture in a mature corporation (intrapreneurship). The goals of the program are for students to develop an entrepreneurial mindset, to gain confidence that they can be successful entrepreneurs, to learn about the entrepreneurial process and to enhance their conceptual and practical skills to pursue new business opportunities. Wide exposure is given to all types of entrepreneurs and industries. The highly experiential program spans the entrepreneurial process from opportunity discovery to venture initiation, growth and exit, and is designed to teach relevant frameworks and theory as well as to develop an entrepreneurial mindset and skills through hands-on application. The program actively provides contact with and support to its alumni.

Leventhal School of Accounting

The Leventhal School offers classes in accounting information systems, financial accounting, managerial accounting and tax accounting. The Leventhal School also offers a Bachelor of Science degree in Accounting. See the Leventhal School pages for a complete listing of information regarding courses, programs and requirements.

International Studies

The Marshall School offers students a variety of opportunities to cultivate a global mind. Classes like international trade and commercial policy, financial management of multinational corporations, international finance, multinational marketing, and international management practices and negotiation broaden students’ understanding of managing a global business. Opportunities to travel and study outside the United States allow students to develop skills for functioning in different cultures, societies and economic environments, and to understand a wide variety of international business practices. Contact the offices of Undergraduate Student Services or Undergraduate Advising for information about international study opportunities at Marshall, including:

GLP/LINC/TIE

Students are encouraged to enroll in one of Marshall’s international experiential learning programs, GLP or LINC. Each includes a 10-day faculty-led trip to a city outside the United States, where students meet with business, political and civic leaders. The Learning about International Commerce (LINC) Program is a 2-unit class open to freshman students who apply. The Global Leadership Program (GLP) is a two-course sequence open by invitation to select first-year students in the incoming freshman class. GLP invitations are extended by the USC Marshall Undergraduate Admissions Office. The Transfer International Experience (TIE) Program is a 2-unit class open to transfer students who apply.

International Exchange Program

The international exchange program is a one-semester exchange program with a host institution in Asia, Australia, South America or Europe during either the fall or spring semester. Exposure to international cultures and practices in business and non-business settings provides another level of understanding of international business. Students complete between four to eight courses at the host institution (15–18 USC units). All instruction is in English, so foreign language proficiency is not required. Courses completed at the host school are graded credit/no credit on the student’s USC transcript. The courses are selected from a list approved by the Marshall School of Business and satisfy the business elective requirement.

International Summer Program

The Marshall School offers unpaid international internship programs in London, Madrid, Dublin, Sydney, Hong Kong, Milan and Singapore during the summer session. The program provides students with theoretical and practical experiences working and navigating within the international global environment. The program consists of an eight-week internship abroad. In addition, unpaid social entrepreneurship internships are offered in Kenya, South Africa, Rwanda and Ghana. Funded internships in Bangkok and Jakarta are also offered.

Research Opportunities for Undergraduates

BUAD 490x Directed Research provides an opportunity to pursue research above and beyond the normal course offerings. This course is open to juniors and seniors with a 3.0 or better grade point average who have obtained approval from a faculty sponsor, the department chair and the Office of Academic Advising by the semester prior to enrollment. Units are assigned on a variable basis with a maximum of 12 units toward an undergraduate degree, 4 units per semester. Students may also work with faculty as research assistants.

Marshall Honors

Marshall Honors, available upon graduation to majors in business administration or accounting, provides a special designation of departmental honors on a student’s transcript. Acceptance to the program requires completion of at least 64 units of course work (including transfer units), a GPA of 3.5 or higher in course work to be applied to the major, an application, and a successful interview with the director of the program. Achievement of Marshall Honors requires completion of BUAD 493 Marshall Honors Research Seminar (4 units) prior to the senior year, a thesis (research project and paper) conducted under the guidance of a Marshall faculty member during the senior year, and a minimum GPA of at least 3.5 in upper-division Marshall School and Leventhal School courses applied to the major. For additional information, contact the Office of Undergraduate Advising, BRI 104, (213) 740-0690 or the program director.

Marshall Undergraduate Academic Advising

Academic advisement is provided through the Office of Undergraduate Advising located in Bridge Hall 104, (213) 740-0690 or undergrad.advising@marshall.usc.edu. Incoming freshman and new transfer students are required to meet with an academic adviser before registering, and this requirement is in effect until 24 USC units are completed. All students are encouraged to see an academic adviser on a regular basis, and continuing USC students may schedule appointments throughout the year.

The Marshall Connections Program (MCP) helps first-year students develop strong connections to the university and the Marshall school. MCP promotes student engagement and success through its co-curricular events, advisement programs and faculty mentors. Free tutoring and a variety of academic support programs and workshops are also offered to all undergraduates.

Registration

Students may register for business courses directly using the Web registration system, according to their scheduled appointment times. Appointment times are based on number of units completed. For example, seniors have the first opportunity to register for a course. It is important to register as soon as one’s appointment allows or priority standing will be lost.

Marshall Undergraduate Student Services

The Marshall School recognizes the importance of integrating education with experience. The Undergraduate Student Services Office, in cooperation with the USC Career Center, assists business school undergraduates with securing externships, internships and full time positions. Moreover, this office provides students with career support and access to alumni. Students who actively participate in these programs maximize their opportunities for professional development and employment after graduation.

Students are also encouraged to participate in student organizations to build leadership, teamwork and networking skills. The Marshall School has more than 40 student organizations.

The Student Services Office also offers over 32 international exchange programs in Asia, Australia, South America and Europe. Through these programs, students spend a semester overseas and fulfill business elective requirements. The office also coordinates international summer internship programs and week-long international travel opportunities in Africa, Asia, South America and Europe.

Honor Societies

Beta Gamma Sigma is the national honor society for business students. The Marshall School of Business chapter has been active since 1923. Juniors in the top 10 percent of the class and seniors in the top 10 percent of the class are invited to join. For further information, contact the Office of Undergraduate Advising.

Transferring College Credit

Community College Courses

USC has established articulation agreements with most community colleges in California. Most academic courses are acceptable for transfer credit from a two-year school, but students will not receive credit for remedial course work. Courses that do not appear on the articulation agreement are not transferable. A maximum of 64 semester units may be transferred. There are university restrictions that apply to transferring course work from other institutions that may affect the above rule. Check with the Degree Progress Department (JHH 010) for information about transferable courses. Prospective freshman or transfer students should contact the USC Admissions Office. Continuing USC students should speak with an adviser in the Marshall Office of Undergraduate Advising.

Official transcripts of college work taken elsewhere must be submitted at the time of application to the USC Office of Admission. All business courses completed at a two year college, if transferable, will be considered elective credit. There is one exception to this policy: Students may transfer two semesters of introductory accounting and receive credit equivalent to one semester of introductory accounting at USC. Then students can register for BUAD 305 Abridged Core Concepts of Accounting Information.

Four Year Colleges

Most courses of an academic nature are acceptable for unit credit from all fully accredited four year institutions. If they do not satisfy specific subject requirements at USC, they will usually be accepted for elective course credit.

Students are urged to complete all their required business courses at USC. ECON 351x and ECON 352x must be completed at USC. All business courses from four year institutions, if transferable, will be considered elective credit unless a challenge examination is passed. All upper division core classes, with the exception of BUAD 497 Strategic Management and BUAD 425 Data Analysis for Decision Making, may be challenged. Students should consult with their academic advisers to initiate the challenge examination process.

Bachelor of Science in Business Administration (World Program)

The World Bachelor in Business (WBB) Program offers students the opportunity for immersive study at three highly regarded business schools, one in each of the major economic/cultural zones of the world: the Americas, Asia and Europe. The program is designed and offered in cooperation with the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) and Bocconi University. Students spend at least one year at each campus and receive a degree from each university. The program is available to entering freshmen only. Prospective students should consult with the USC Marshall Undergraduate Admissions office for program and admissions information.

Requirements for Completion

To complete the program and receive a degree from each university, students must satisfy the degree requirements of each institution, which include language requirements. The USC degree requirements are those of the USC Marshall Bachelor of Science in Business Administration program, with the exception that WBB students do not need to complete 60 units of non-business course work. Students should consult with the WBB program academic adviser at each university. Specific courses completed at each university are used to fulfill specific requirements at the other universities.

Students should note the following USC degree requirements for the WBB program:

  • A minimum of 32 units must be taken in residence at USC. The units applied toward this requirement must be taken for a letter grade and cannot be taken on a P/NP or CR/NC basis.
  • In addition to meeting university GPA requirements, a minimum grade of C- must be earned on all upper division course work taken at USC and required for the major.
  • A minimum grade of C- for course work completed at HKUST and Bocconi University must be earned for the course credits to transfer to USC.
  • USC GPA calculations will be based on course work completed at USC.
Sample Program

WBB students spend the first year taking classes in Los Angeles at USC, the second year taking classes in Hong Kong at HKUST and the third year taking classes in Milan at Bocconi University. In the final year, students choose their location of study in consultation with the program directors. Each year includes at least one cohort class designed specifically for the WBB program.

The following sample program does not represent a required sequence of study; rather, it serves as a guideline. Students will meet with a WBB program academic adviser at each location to ensure that each student’s program of study will fulfill WBB program requirements.

YEAR ONE — USC UNITS
Semester one
BUAD 304 Organizational Behavior and Leadership 4
GE VI* Social Issues 4
MATH 118x Fundamental Principles of the Calculus 4
WRIT 150 Writing and Critical Reasoning — Thematic Approaches 4
Semester two
BUAD 104x Learning About International Commerce 2
ECON 351x Microeconomics for Business 4
GE IV Science and Its Significance 4
GE V Arts and Letters 4
WRIT 340 Advanced Writing 4
Total 34
*Students should choose an ‘m’ designated class for GE VI to fulfill the diversity requirement.

YEAR TWO — HKUST UNITS
Semester one
ECON 2123 Macroeconomics 3
ECON 2174 Mathematics for Economists 4
HLTH 1010 Healthy Lifestyle 0
USC GE III Scientific Inquiry [HKUST: Science and Technology] 3
Chinese Communications 3
Understanding Business in Asia 2
Semester two
ACCT 2010 Principles of Accounting I 3
ISOM 2010 Introduction to Information Systems 3
ISOM 2500 Business Statistics 3
ISOM 2700 Operations Management 3
USC GE II Global Cultures and Traditions [HKUST: Humanities] 3
Seminars in Asia’s Business 1
Total 31
YEAR THREE — BOCCONI UNITS
Semester one
30006 Financial Markets and Institutions 3
30015 Marketing 3
30017 Corporate Finance 3
30047 Introduction to the Legal System I 3
30152 Public Management 3
Semester two
30007 Managerial Accounting 3
30048 Introduction to the Legal System II 3
30056 European Economic Policy 3
USC GE I Western Cultures and Traditions [Bocconi Economic History requirement] 3
Doing Business in Europe 1
Language 2 3
Total 31
YEAR FOUR, OPTION ONE — USC UNITS
Semester one
BUAD 302 Communication Strategy in Business 4
BUAD 497 Strategic Management 4
MOR 421 Social and Ethical Issues in Business 4
Free electives 4
Semester two
BUAD 425 Data Analysis for Decision Making 2
BUAD 490x Directed Research 2
FBE 403 Introduction to the Legal Environment of Business 4
Free electives 8
Total 32
YEAR FOUR, OPTION TWO — HKUST UNITS
Semester one
MGMT 4110 Business Ethics and Policy 4
MGMT 4210 Corporate Strategy 4
Best Practices in Corporate Communication 3
Free electives 6
Semester two
ACCT 3610 Functions of Law in Society and Business 3
Capstone project 4
Free electives 8
Total 32
YEAR FOUR, OPTION THREE — BOCCONI UNITS
Semester one
30012 Business Strategy 4
30223 Marketing Communication 3
Free electives 9
Semester two
30058 Comparative Business and European Law 4
30216 Social Responsibility in Business, Government and Non-Profit 3
Final report 2
Free electives 7
Total 32

Total units: 128

Bachelor of Science in Business Administration (Cinematic Arts)

This program consists of courses offered by both the Marshall School and the School of Cinematic Arts. Students completing the program receive a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with an emphasis in Cinematic Arts. The program is available to entering freshmen only.

Requirements for Completion

To complete the program, students must satisfy all requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree in business as well as an additional 24 units in cinematic arts, which specifically address the business side of the industry.

Business requirements Units
BUAD 285ab Accounting Fundamentals, Financial and Managerial Accounting (4-2), or
BUAD 286ab Accounting Fundamentals, Managerial and Financial Accounting (4-2) 6
BUAD 302 Communication Strategy in Business 4
BUAD 304 Organizational Behavior and Leadership 4
BUAD 306 Business Finance 4
BUAD 307 Marketing Fundamentals 4
BUAD 310 Applied Business Statistics 4
BUAD 311 Operations Management 4
BUAD 425 Data Analysis for Decision Making 2
BUAD 497 Strategic Management 4
ECON 351x Microeconomics for Business 4
ECON 352x Macroeconomics for Business 4
MATH 118x* Fundamental Principles of the Calculus, or
MATH 125** Calculus I 4
Electives Business 300- or 400-level ACCT, BAEP, non-core BUAD, BUCO, FBE, IOM or DSO, MKT or MOR 12
Total business units 60
*Placement into MATH 118x is contingent on successful completion of MATH 117 or obtaining an acceptable score on the math placement exam or AP calculus or IB mathematics exam. The MATH 118x requirement may be waived with an AP Calculus AB or BC score of 4 or higher, or an IB math score of 5 or higher.

**A-level mathematics examination scores of A or B may receive subject credit for MATH 125. Eligible students should speak with their academic adviser for additional information.

Cinematic Arts requirements Units
CNTV 463 Television: Integrating Creative and Business Objectives 2
CNTV 467 The Future of Digital Media and the Entertainment Industry 2
CNTV 495 Internship in Cinematic Arts 2
CTCS 190 Introduction to Cinema 4
CTCS 191 Introduction to Television and Video 4
CTIN 458 Business and Management of Games 2
CTPR 385 Colloquium: Motion Picture Production Techniques 4
CTPR 410 The Movie Business: From Story Concept to Exhibition 2
CTPR 460 Film Business Procedures and Distribution 2
Total cinematic arts units 24
Total program units: 84

Bachelor of Science in Computer Science/Business Administration

This combined program offers qualified students the opportunity to gain an educational foundation in both computer science and business administration. Students must meet the admission requirements for both programs. The degree is administered by the USC Viterbi School of Engineering; see Computer Science for complete degree requirements.

Bachelor of Science in Business Administration (International Relations)

This program consists of courses offered by both the Marshall School of Business and the School of International Relations. Students completing the program receive a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with an emphasis in International Relations.

Requirements for Completion

To complete the program, students must satisfy all requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree in business as well as an additional 24 units in international relations from the courses listed below.

business requirements units
BUAD 285ab Accounting Fundamentals, Financial and Managerial Accounting (4-2), or
BUAD 286ab Accounting Fundamentals, Managerial and Financial Accounting (4-2) 6
BUAD 302 Communication Strategy in Business 4
BUAD 304 Organizational Behavior and Leadership 4
BUAD 306 Business Finance 4
BUAD 307 Marketing Fundamentals 4
BUAD 310 Applied Business Statistics 4
BUAD 311 Operations Management 4
BUAD 425 Data Analysis for Decision Making 2
BUAD 497 Strategic Management 4
ECON 351x Microeconomics for Business 4
ECON 352x Macroeconomics for Business 4
MATH 118x* Fundamental Principles of the Calculus, or
MATH 125** Calculus I 4
Electives 300- or 400-level ACCT, BAEP, non-core BUAD, BUCO, FBE, IOM or DSO, MKT or MOR 12
Total business units 60
*Placement into MATH 118x is contingent on successful completion of MATH 117 or obtaining an acceptable score on the math placement exam or AP calculus or IB mathematics exam. The MATH 118x requirement may be waived with an AP Calculus AB or BC score of 4 or higher, or an IB math score of 5 or higher.

**A-level mathematics examination scores of A or B may receive subject credit for MATH 125. Eligible students should speak with their academic adviser for additional information.

international relations requirements units
IR 210 International Relations: Introductory Analysis 4
International Political Economy Courses (4 units)
Choose one:
IR 324 Multinational Enterprises and World Politics 4
IR 325 Rich and Poor States in the World Political Economy 4
IR 326 U.S. Foreign Economic Policy 4
IR 330 Politics of the World Economy 4
International Relations Regional Courses (8 units)
Choose two:
IR 333 China in International Affairs 4
IR 345 Russian and Soviet Foreign Policy 4
IR 360 International Relations of the Pacific Rim 4
IR 361 South and Southeast Asia in International Affairs 4
IR 362 The International Relations of the Contemporary Middle East 4
IR 363 Middle East Political Economy 4
IR 364 The Political Economy of Latin American Development 4
IR 365 Politics and Democracy in Latin America 4
IR 367 Africa in International Affairs 4
IR 369 Contemporary European International Relations 4
IR 383 Third World Negotiations 4
IR 385 European Foreign Policy and Security Issues 4
IR 439 Political Economy of Russia and Eurasia 4
IR 442 Japanese Foreign Policy 4
IR 465 Contemporary Issues in United States-Latin American Relations 4
IR 468 European Integration 4
International Relations Electives (8 units)
Choose two from the list below or the two lists immediately above:
IR 305 Managing New Global Challenges 4
IR 306 International Organizations 4
IR 310 Introduction to Peace and Conflict Studies 4
IR 315 Ethnicity and Nationalism in World Politics 4
IR 316 Gender and Global Issues 4
IR 323 Politics of Global Environment 4
IR 327 International Negotiation 4
IR 341 Foreign Policy Analysis 4
IR 344 Developing Countries in World Politics 4
IR 381 Introduction to International Security 4
IR 382 Order and Disorder in Global Affairs 4
IR 402 Theories of War 4
IR 427 Seminar on Economics and Security 4
IR 444 Issues and Theories in Global Society 4
IR 483 War and Diplomacy: The U.S. in World Affairs 4
Total international relations units 24
Total program units: 84

Food Industry Management Concentrated Program

Certificate Program

The Food Industry Management Concentrated Program offers undergraduate and graduate courses emphasizing marketing, retailing, financial and management aspects of the food industry. Completion of the program is acknowledged by a Food Industry Management Certificate.

To qualify for admission and a scholarship grant for the undergraduate food industry management concentrated program, students must be currently employed in a management position in the food retailing, wholesaling or manufacturing industry; be recommended by their employer; and be in their junior or senior year with an academic standing adequate for admission to USC.

To receive a certificate, students must complete 16 units during the one-semester program. Students must take all required FIM courses for the time they are in the program.

SPRING SEMESTER UNITS
FIM 420 Food Retailing Management 4
FIM 480 Food Industry Financial Accounting and Analysis 4
FIM 481 Food Marketing Research 4
FIM 582 Food Industry Decision-Making 4
16