School of Pharmacy

Graduate Degrees

The School of Pharmacy, through the Graduate School, offers curricula leading to the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in pharmaceutical sciences, in molecular pharmacology and toxicology, and in health economics, as well as a Ph.D. in clinical and experimental therapeutics. The school also offers interdisciplinary M.S. degrees in regulatory science and in the management of drug development. The M.S. degree in pharmaceutical economics and policy is offered jointly with the USC Price School of Public Policy and the Department of Economics. In addition, the school offers dual degrees with the schools of law, business, gerontology and medicine as well as other programs. Instructions given in the Admission section of this catalogue are to be followed, but the application and the supplemental information requested should first be submitted to: Graduate Programs Office, USC School of Pharmacy, 1985 Zonal Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90033. Additional information may be obtained by calling (323) 442-1474 or sending email to pharmgrd@usc.edu.

Admission Requirements for the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy in Pharmaceutical Sciences

Applicants should possess a bachelor’s degree or equivalent from an accredited college or university. A minimum grade point average of 3.0 and qualifying scores on the GRE in the verbal and quantitative tests are required. In addition to excellent communication skills, applicants should possess knowledge and competence equivalent to one year of acceptable course work in at least three of the following disciplines: mathematics, organic chemistry, physical chemistry, biochemistry, physiology and pharmacology. In addition to the application for admission, three letters of recommendation from faculty members who can evaluate the promise of the applicant for graduate study and a personal statement summarizing career objectives and research interests must be submitted.

Applicants who do not meet all the specific requirements indicated above, but who show unique potential, may be considered for admission with conditions which may be fulfilled during the first semester of enrollment. See the Graduate School section of this catalogue.

Admission Requirements for the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy in Molecular Pharmacology and Toxicology

Applicants should possess a bachelor’s degree or equivalent from an accredited college or university. A minimum grade point average of 3.0 and qualifying scores on the GRE in verbal and quantitative tests are required. In addition to excellent communication skills, applicants should possess knowledge and competence equivalent to one year of work in at least three of the following disciplines: mathematics, organic chemistry, physical chemistry, biochemistry, molecular biology, cell biology, physiology, pharmacology, economics, statistics and computer sciences. In addition to the application for admission, the candidate must submit three letters of recommendation from faculty members who can evaluate the promise of the applicant for graduate study and a personal statement summarizing the candidate’s career objectives and research interests. Students will be selected for admission on the basis of their academic and scientific record, and, whenever possible, interviews (in person or by phone) with one or more members of the faculty.

Admission Requirements for the Master of Science in Pharmaceutical Economics and Policy

Applicants for admission must have achieved a minimum 3.0 GPA in undergraduate or professional school and adequate scores on the GRE. In addition, applicants will be required to have completed upper division courses in statistical methods, calculus and microeconomics.

Admission Requirements for the Doctor of Philosophy in Clinical and Experimental Therapeutics

Applicants should possess a bachelor’s degree in quantitative/biological sciences (or health profession) or an advanced health professional degree (i.e., Pharm.D., M.D., DDS) from an accredited college or university. A minimum grade point average of 3.0 and qualifying scores on the GRE in the verbal and quantitative tests are required. A student currently enrolled in the Pharm.D. program may pursue a Pharm.D./Ph.D. dual degree following the admission procedure in the Catalogue.

In addition to the application for admission, three letters of recommendation from faculty members who can evaluate the promise of the applicant for graduate study and a personal statement summarizing career objectives and research interests must be submitted.

Applicants who do not meet all the specific requirements indicated above, but who show unique potential, may be considered for admission with conditions, which may be fulfilled during the first semester of enrollment. See the Graduate School section of this catalogue for further information.

Admission Requirements for the Doctor of Philosophy in Health Economics

Candidates with a bachelor’s, master’s or Pharm.D. degree are invited to apply. Applicants must have demonstrated proficiency in verbal and written English and aptitude in economics, mathematics, statistics and computer science. Deficiencies in economics and statistical background can be addressed through preliminary course work after admission to the program.

A minimum grade point average of at least 3.0 (A = 4.0) is required. Special attention is given to the grades achieved in economics, statistics and mathematics courses relevant to the program. A qualifying score on the GRE in verbal and quantitative areas is required. Students with GRE scores of 1200 or better will be given priority for financial aid support.

Admission Requirements for the Master of Science in Health Care Decision Analysis

Applicants should possess a bachelor’s degree or equivalent from an accredited college or university. Applicants with graduate or professional degrees are encouraged to apply. A minimum grade point average of 3.0 and qualifying scores on the GRE examination are required. The program encourages the participation of part-time students with work experience. Acceptance criteria for those individuals will be assessed on a case-by-case basis. English proficiency is essential. Additional requirements for international students are outlined by university regulations under Admission of International Students.

Admission Requirements for the Master of Science in Regulatory Science

Applicants should possess a bachelor’s degree or equivalent from an accredited college or university. Applicants with graduate or professional degrees are encouraged to apply. A minimum grade point average of 3.0 or qualifying scores on the GRE or equivalent examination are required. The program encourages the participation of part-time students with work experience.

Acceptance criteria for those individuals will be assessed on a case-by-case basis. English proficiency is essential. Students will be selected for admission, whenever possible, after interviews with one or more members of faculty.

Admission Requirements for the Master of Science in Management of Drug Development

Applicants should possess a bachelor’s degree or equivalent from an accredited college or university. Applicants with graduate or professional degrees are encouraged to apply. A minimum grade point average of 3.0 or equivalent and qualifying scores on the GRE or equivalent examination are required. The program encourages the participation of part-time students with work experience. Acceptance criteria for those individuals will be assessed on a case-by-case basis. English proficiency is essential.

Admission of International Students to Graduate Degree Programs

All requirements described in this section are also applicable to the admission of international students. In addition, special application and admission procedures are required of international students. Refer to the section on Admission of International Students in this catalogue.

Degree Requirements

These degrees are under the jurisdiction of the Graduate School. Students should also refer to the Requirements for Graduation section and the Graduate School section of this catalogue for general regulations. All courses applied toward the degrees must be courses accepted by the Graduate School.

Master of Science in Pharmaceutical Sciences

A Master of Science in the pharmaceutical sciences will be granted on the basis of completion of at least 24 units of formal course work and presentation of an acceptable thesis (PSCI 594ab, 4 units) based on the results of an original investigation.

The 24 units of course work must be at the 500-level or above, exclusive of directed research. At least 16 of the 24 required units must be taken from courses offered within the Department of Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences (courses within the department have designations of either PSCI or MPTX). The remaining units can be taken from courses offered within the Department of Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences or in various related disciplines outside the department if approved by the Department of Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences Graduate Affairs Committee.

Master of Science in Molecular Pharmacology and Toxicology

A Master of Science in molecular pharmacology and toxicology will be granted on the basis of completion of at least 24 units of formal course work and presentation of an acceptable thesis (MPTX 594ab, 4 units) based on the results of an original investigation.

The 24 units of course work must be at the 500-level or above, exclusive of directed research. At least 16 of the 24 required units must be taken from courses offered within the Department of Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences (courses within the department have designations of either PSCI or MPTX). The remaining units can be taken from courses offered within the Department of Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences or in various related disciplines outside the department if approved by the Department of Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences Graduate Affairs Committee.

Master of Science in Pharmaceutical Economics and Policy

The Department of Pharmaceutical Economics and Policy (School of Pharmacy) offers a program of study leading to the M.S. degree. Applicants must apply to the Graduate School and meet the admissions requirements of the program. This program requires students to demonstrate skills in the analysis of pharmaceutical and health technology innovations, as well as an understanding of contemporary health policy issues.

A minimum of 36 units of graduate level courses is required.

Grade Point Average

A grade point average of at least 3.0 (A = 4.0) must be achieved on graduate course work at USC.

Recommended Courses

It is recommended that the student complete the following 36 units of graduate level course work: ECON 414 (4 units), ECON 500 (4 units) or PPD 501ab (4 units), PM 511aL (4 units), PM 512 (4 units) or approved elective, PMEP 509 (4 units), PMEP 519 (4 units), PMEP 529 (4 units), PMEP 538 (4 units) and PMEP 539 (4 units).

Students must complete all recommended courses for the degree within five years of entry into the program.

Additional Degree Requirements

The student must satisfactorily complete the recommended courses in economics, preventive medicine and public administration prior to enrolling in PMEP 538. The student is also required to complete an empirical research project on a topic relevant to pharmaceutical economics and policy.

Master of Science in Health Care Decision Analysis

Curriculum Requirements

A Master of Science degree in health care decision analysis will be granted upon completion of at least 33 units of formal course work. Students with experience in industry or government can substitute an equivalent amount of formal course work with a research project, subject to the approval from program administrators.

Course requirements normally include a minimum of eight courses (24 units) with emphasis on applied health care policy, business intelligence and technical analysis. Recommended course work and electives include some courses available in other departments of the university and will be selected in consultation with the program advisers according to the areas of intended specialization of the participant in order to meet the credit requirements of the program. Students should develop a specific plan of study in consultation with the graduate advisers before beginning the program.

Grade Point Average

A grade point average of at least 3.0 (A = 4.0) must be achieved on graduate course work at USC.

Master of Science in Regulatory Science

Regulatory science relates the regulatory and legal requirements of biomedical product development to the scientific study needed to establish product safety and efficacy. A Master of Science degree in regulatory science will be granted upon completion of at least 30 units of formal course work and 6 units of research project work in an internship setting (MPTX 630). Students with experience in industry or government can substitute an equivalent amount of formal course work for the research project with the permission of the admissions committee. Course requirements normally include a minimum of three courses concerned with regulatory aspects of medical product development and a minimum of one course each in quality assurance, clinical research, business, statistics and law. Recommended course work includes some courses available in other departments of the university. Students should develop a specific plan of study in consultation with the graduate advisers before beginning the program.

Master of Science in Management of Drug Development

A Master of Science degree in the management of drug development will be granted upon completion of at least 32 units of course and research project work. The program is offered on both a full-time and part-time basis, and courses are also available in distance formats. Most students will take six units of directed research as part of this program. Students with appropriate industry or laboratory experience can substitute an equivalent amount of formal course work for the research project with the permission of the program director. Course requirements normally include a minimum of three courses concerned with translational aspects of medical product development. Recommended courses to satisfy this core requirement include RSCI 530, RSCI 531, RSCI 532, PSCI 664 or CXPT 609. The program must also include a minimum of one course in each of: regulatory science, quality assurance, clinical research, business and statistics. Students should develop a specific plan of study in consultation with graduate advisers before beginning the program.

Doctor of Regulatory Science

The Doctor of Regulatory Science program cultivates research, leadership and inquiry skills for advanced students in the emerging profession of global regulatory science. It is designed to produce graduates with expertise in strategic management, policy development and research assessment who can play leadership roles in the public sector, academia and the medical products industry. Participants in this program will take a set of interdependent courses that extend from a strong core of basic regulatory science course work and additionally focus on three main areas — global product strategy, product lifecycle strategy, and project and personnel management. After students have completed foundational course work, they will participate as a cohort that typically has a two-year cycle of classes and an additional year of dissertation research. The program has been designed to meet the needs of individuals who are already working full-time outside of the university. The doctoral degree will be administered by the School of Pharmacy.

Admission

The program is designed for individuals with strong professional experience and demonstrated intellectual and leadership capabilities. Applicants are expected to have a GPA of 3.0 on university-level course work and five or more years of professional experience. Admission requirements include university transcripts, a resume, at least three letters of reference, and a one-page personal statement that outlines the background and goals of the applicant. Students are encouraged even at this early stage to identify areas in which they are interested in conducting research. Additional requirements for international students are outlined by university regulations under Admission of International Students. Students are not required to provide GRE scores unless indicated by the program director.

Students with an appropriate graduate or professional degree may use some previous graduate courses as transfer units toward the overall credit requirements of the Doctor of Regulatory Science program with the approval of the program director and under the normal rules of the university. Students who have graduated from the M.S. program in Regulatory Science can apply all of the previously taken course work toward the doctoral degree. Students with graduate degrees from outside of the regulatory science program are required to take a minimum of 32 units of course work and 4 units of dissertation research to complete the requirements for graduation. The course work requirements will be determined on an individual basis in consultation with the program director and participant’s advisers.

Curriculum Requirements

The Doctor of Regulatory Science is administered by the School of Pharmacy. It requires participants to complete 64 units that include the following elements:

REQUIREMENTS UNITS
Foundation courses 15
Product lifecycle strategy 8
Global strategy 8
Project/personnel management 8
Research methods 4
Dissertation 4

Additional elective course work will be selected in consultation with the program advisers according to the areas of intended specialization of the participant in order to meet the credit requirements of the program. Typically foundational courses and some electives will be taken in the first two years of the program. Advanced courses in product lifecycle strategy, global strategy and project/personnel management will normally be taken by the doctoral cohort of students during the third and fourth years of the program. Dissertation planning and research will typically commence in the third year of the program, and extend until the successful completion of the dissertation.

Foundation Courses

Fifteen or more units of foundation courses may be taken as part of the master’s program in regulatory science, or with prior approval, from another graduate program with similar objectives. Required foundational courses normally include: MPTX 511 Introduction to Medical Product Regulation; two from MPTX 512 Regulation of Pharmaceutical and Biological Products, MPTX 513 Regulation of Medical Devices and Diagnostics, MPTX 514 Regulation of Food and Dietary Supplements; MPTX 515 Quality Systems and Standards; MPTX 516 Medical Products and the Law; MPTX 517 Structure and Management of Clinical Trials. Other courses may be substituted after the participant’s background preparation has been considered.

Product Lifecycle Strategy

Eight or more units of course work related to product lifecycle management, from discovery to commercialization, will be drawn from a broad list of courses offered in regulatory science or through the Titus Family Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Economics and Policy. Included in this list are: PMEP 538 Pharmaceutical Economics; PMEP 539 Economic Assessment of Medical Care; RSCI 601 Biomedical Commerce. Other courses may also be considered in consultation with the supervisors and program director. Students are also encouraged to take courses outside the School of Pharmacy when more specialized courses fit their professional research or development plans.

Global Regulatory Strategy and Policy

Eight or more units of course work related to global regulatory strategy could include some of the following courses: MPTX 519 Global Regulation of Medical Products; PPD 571 International Public Policy and Management Seminar; RSCI 604 Regulatory Strategy in Asia; RSCI 608 Regulatory Strategy in Europe and the Americas.

Project and Personnel Management

Eight or more units of relevant course work should typically include: MPTX 602 Science, Research and Ethics; RSCI 603 Managing Complex Projects; RSCI 605 Managing Organizations and Human Resources. Graduate courses in other university departments or schools can be substituted with the approval of the program director.

Research Methods

Participants will typically take PMEP 509 Research Design or MPTX 522 Introduction to Clinical Design and Statistics.

Student Progress and Assessments

In the third year, students are expected to identify a pair of advisers including one USC faculty member and one adviser from industry or the private sector. Students are typically placed in study groups of three or four whose dissertation interests are most similar and whose collective supervisors will oversee their academic and research progress. This committee will form the dissertation committee.

At the completion of the foundational course work, students will undergo a competency review that will include considerations of academic progress. Students are expected to maintain a GPA of 3.0 and will be required to pass a written examination designed to assure the professional competence of the student prior to advancing further in the program. Students who do not pass this preliminary review, administered prior to entering the dissertation and advanced course work phase of the program, will be notified of dismissal from the program in writing by the associate dean for graduate studies in the School of Pharmacy.

Doctoral Dissertation

Students must enroll in RSCI 794 Doctoral Dissertation for at least two terms, during which time they will develop a dissertation proposal and conduct the necessary research and analysis in collaboration with the supervisory team. The dissertation committee will approve the thesis plan and monitor its progress. Each student will be required to produce and defend an independent dissertation as a requirement for graduation. A maximum of 6 dissertation units can be applied to satisfy the degree requirement, but students should register for the dissertation units in each term subsequent to the completion of their course work requirements. Institutional Review Board approval is required for all human studies.

Doctor of Philosophy in Clinical and Experimental Therapeutics

The goal of the Ph.D. program in Clinical and Experimental Therapeutics is to develop a scientist who is engaged in team science through interdisciplinary education; competent in conducting research across clinical and basic science disciplines; and integrates basic investigations and clinical observations in applied research to better understand disease process, advance drug development and evaluate efficacy and toxicity of therapeutic regimens with the goal of improving the safe, effective and economical use of therapeutic modalities by patients.

The program applies an interdisciplinary approach that focuses the graduate studies directly toward translational, rather than basic science, aiming to educate students with the perspective and skill set to identify important connections between fundamental biomedical research and human disease. This program emphasizes cross-training between clinical and basic sciences focusing on the investigation of disease processes, drug development and the efficacy and toxicity of therapeutic regimens. Course requirements and research opportunities for graduate students enrolled in the program provide both experimental (basic) and disease-focused experiences that complement the graduate’s research focus.

Course Requirements

A minimum of 60 units is required. At least 26 of the 60 units are to be formal graduate course work at the 500-level or above, exclusive of seminars and directed research. Students must complete 14 units of course work before they are eligible for the screening procedure. Additional course work relevant to the research interests of the student may be required by the student’s advisers or the student’s qualifying exam committee, with an emphasis on cross-training and taking into account the amount and level of previous scientific preparation and the nature of the research dissertation that will be the major endpoint of the program. Specifically, recommended course work differs between students who have an advanced professional degree (Track I) and those who do not (Track II). A maximum of 12 units may be transferred from graduate studies elsewhere.

In the first year, all students (Tracks I and II) are recommended to take 14 units of course work in translational medicine (RSCI 530, 2 units), research design (CXPT 609, 4 units), biostatistics (PM 510L, 4 units), and clinical trial design (MPTX 517, 4 units). In the second year, Track I students will take the remaining 12 units of course work as electives based on the background of the student and the proposed research focus of the student. Track II students who do not have an advanced professional degree are recommended to select from the following courses as part of their electives: systems physiology and disease (INTD 572 and INTD 573, 4 units each) or pathology (INTD 550 and INTD 551, 4 units each). Other electives that can be chosen are INTD 531, INTD 561, PATH 580, PM 533, PM 538, PM 570, PSCI 661L and PSCI 665.

The remaining 34 of the 60 units required for the Ph.D. degree may be fulfilled with other courses including ethics, interdisciplinary seminar, directed research and dissertation. Note that to become eligible to take the qualifying exam, Track II students must fulfill the prescribed clinical experiences that match the disease-related topic of the student’s thesis work as approved by the student’s advisers and advisory committee. Students with a bachelor’s degree in a health care subject area (e.g., nursing, pharmacy, medicine) will be evaluated on a case basis and may be required to meet the therapeutic course work or clinical experience component described above, as determined by their background and previous experiences.

Foreign Language Requirement

There is no formal language requirement. However, an individual qualifying exam committee can require competency in a foreign language or a computer language if it is relevant for the student’s area of research.

Qualifying Exam Committee

Upon admission, the student will be assigned to a member of the graduate faculty who will serve as his or her temporary adviser until a permanent adviser has been identified. The student’s program of study will be under the direction of the qualifying exam committee composed of at least five members, one of whom must be from outside the department. Because of the centrality of research in the Ph.D. program, the student is encouraged to get acquainted with the participating faculty mentors from the day they enter the program, and have selected a research direction, paired graduate advisers (clinical and basic scientists), and qualifying exam committee no later than the third semester of study. The graduate affairs committee will serve as the qualifying exam committee until one is selected.

Screening Procedure

The performance of each student will be evaluated no later than the end of the second semester of enrollment in the graduate program. This screening procedure is conducted by the student’s qualifying exam committee or, if a student has not yet selected a qualifying exam committee, by the graduate affairs committee. The committee reviews the student’s progress to date in various areas including course work, research interests, and laboratory performance on his or her research project or laboratory rotations. If a performance deficiency is determined, specific goals will be established that the student must fulfill to continue in the program. Passing this screening procedure is prerequisite to continuation in the Ph.D. program.

Qualifying Examination

Students will be required to pass a comprehensive written and oral examination on the chosen disease-focused area of research emphasis. The examination will encompass basic scientific concepts relevant to the disease under study and the laboratory techniques in that discipline, fundamental principles of clinical research and design, biostatistics, and therapeutics in the chosen disease-focused area of research. The examination is administered by the qualifying exam committee and consists of two parts: a written examination administered to all students at the end of their second year of study and a detailed written proposal and its oral presentation and defense by the student to the qualifying exam committee. The examination process is conducted by the student’s advisory committee with oversight by the graduate affairs committee. All course and qualifying examination requirements for the Doctor of Philosophy must be completed within two-and-a-half years after admission. After passing these examinations, the student is admitted to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree.

Dissertation

A dissertation based on original investigation in a relevant scientific area is required for the Ph.D. The dissertation research must represent a significant contribution to science and should demonstrate the candidate’s scholarly advancement and competence to undertake independent research. An oral defense of the dissertation will be held after the candidate submits the final draft of the dissertation to the dissertation committee. (See Theses and Dissertations in the Graduate School section.)

Student Teaching

Teaching experience is considered an integral part of the training of graduate students. As part of the general requirements for the Ph.D. degree, each student is required to participate in the teaching program of the School of Pharmacy.

Doctor of Philosophy in Health Economics

The Titus Family Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Economics and Policy (School of Pharmacy) offers a program of study leading to the Ph.D. degree in Health Economics. The program focuses on microeconomics; econometrics; health economics and policy; public finance; pharmaceutical economics and policy. The program offers one track in microeconomics and a second track in pharmaceutical economics and policy.

Microeconomics Track

Students in the microeconomics track will complete the microeconomic theory and econometric sequence and course work in health economics. They will receive focused training and mentoring in health economics through collaboration on research projects.

Foreign Language Requirement

There is no formal foreign language requirement. However, competence in the use of one computer programming language is required for the graduate degrees. Such competence can be demonstrated either by course work or examination.

Grade Point Average

A grade point average (GPA) of at least 3.0 and typically considerably higher (on a scale of 4.0) must have been achieved on all graduate work at USC for the passing of the screening procedure. The Graduate School requires a minimum GPA of 3.0 on all course work taken as a graduate student at USC.

Unit Requirements and Recommended Courses

The Ph.D. in Health Economics requires a minimum of 64 units of graduate-level courses numbered 500 or higher (excluding 794) and a minimum of 4 units of 794. A maximum of two full courses (eight units) or their equivalent may be PMEP 790 (research) since directed research will generally be incorporated into most 500- and 600- level courses. Exceptions will be considered on an individual basis. Normally, a full-time graduate student course load is three full courses or their equivalent per semester, with a four-course maximum.

MicroEconomics Track units
Satisfactory completion of the economic theory sequence with a grade point average of B or higher. At least one of the econometrics courses must be completed with a grade of B or higher:
ECON 503 Microeconomic Theory I (4), or
GSBA 602 Selected Issues in EconomicTheory (3) 3-4
ECON 511 Econometric Methods 4
ECON 514 Probability and Statistics for Economists 4
ECON 603 Microeconomic Theory II (4), or
GSBA 603 Foundations of Statistical Inference (3) 3-4
ECON 615 Applied Econometrics 4

Satisfactory completion of the health economics sequence with a grade point average of B or higher:
PMEP 509 Research Design 4
PM 511abL Data Analysis 4
PMEP 519 Survey Research and Quality of Life Assessment 4
PMEP 529 Risk, Probabilities and Preferences 4
PMEP 534 Health Economics I 4
PMEP 544 Health Economics II 4
ECON 693 Seminar in Applied Economics and Public Policy, or 2, max 4
PMEP 698 Seminar in Pharmaceutical Economics and Policy 1, max 4

Three electives at the 500 level or higher from the School of Pharmacy’s Health Economics Program and from the departments of economics, mathematical statistics, biometry, epidemiology, public administration, computer science or other relevant fields are required.

Qualifying Exam

The student will be assigned to a member of the graduate faculty who will serve as his or her temporary adviser until the formation of a qualifying exam committee. The student should consult the health economics director of graduate studies on the appointment of a Ph.D. qualifying exam committee after taking the written screening examinations. The chairman of the student’s Ph.D. qualifying exam committee advises the student on matters of curriculum and graduate opportunities. The qualifying exam committee comprises three to five members, at least one of whom can be from outside the department; at least two members must specialize in the student’s area of emphasis; and at least three of the members must be suitable for service on the student’s dissertation committee. The composition of all Ph.D. qualifying exam committees must be approved by the health economics director of graduate studies. The student must form his or her qualifying exam committee soon after passing the departmental screening procedure.

Screening Procedure

The student’s progress will be reviewed after each semester and before registration for any additional course work to determine if progress has been satisfactory. The screening procedure will include satisfactory performance on written screening exams covering the major topics covered in the recommended coursework for each track.

Seminar Requirements

Every student is recommended to take and satisfactorily complete 4 units of research seminars chosen from ECON 693, PMEP 698 or the equivalent. At least one of these seminars must be related to the student’s major field, and the same seminar may be taken more than once. Before completing the dissertation, it is recommended that the student present at least one original research paper in a seminar of his or her choice. This paper should typically consist of original results contained in the student’s dissertation.

Dissertation Proposal Preparation

The student is required to register for two units of PMEP 790 and write a research paper on a topic suitable for a dissertation. Typically, the chair of the student’s guidance committee directs this work. The resulting essay becomes part of the student’s written dissertation proposal which is presented and critiqued during the oral portion of the qualifying examination.

Qualifying Examination

Upon successful completion of the first two years of course and grade requirements, and following passing of required screening procedures, the student takes a general written and oral examination on the chosen area of research emphasis after presenting a detailed written dissertation proposal. After passing these examinations, the student is admitted to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree.

Dissertation

After admission to candidacy, the student forms a dissertation committee comprising three faculty members, one of whom can be from an outside department. The chair of this committee is the dissertation supervisor. The student must register for PMEP 794 each semester, excluding summer sessions, until the dissertation and all other degree requirements are completed.

The student is expected to complete a dissertation based on an original investigation. The dissertation must represent a significant contribution to knowledge and must be defended in an oral examination administered by the dissertation committee (see the section on Theses and Dissertations).

Student Teaching

Teaching experience is considered an integral part of the training of graduate students. As part of the general requirements for the Ph.D., all students are required to undergo training as an educator. This will include participating in seminars on educational techniques and hands-on teaching experiences through participation in didactic and small group teaching in the School of Pharmacy or the USC Price School of Public Policy.

Pharmaceutical Economics and Policy Track

Students in the pharmaceutical economics and policy track will specialize in areas such as cost-effectiveness, comparative effectiveness, drug therapy outcomes and organization of pharmaceutical markets. They will receive focused training and mentoring in pharmaceutical economics and policy through collaboration on research projects.

Foreign Language Requirement

There is no formal foreign language requirement. However, competence in the use of one computer programming language is required for the graduate degrees. Such competence can be demonstrated either by course work or examination.

Grade Point Average

A grade point average of at least 3.0 (A = 4.0) must have been achieved on graduate course work at USC. ECON 615 or a higher level course in econometrics must be completed with a grade of B or higher.

Unit Requirements and Recommended Courses

Students are required to complete a minimum of 64 units of graduate level course work. The following courses are recommended towards fulfilling the 64-unit requirement: ECON 401, ECON 500, ECON 511, ECON 513, ECON 514, ECON 615, PM 511a, PMEP 509, PMEP 519, PMEP 529, PMEP 538, PMEP 539, PMEP 549 and PMEP 698. Students may transfer and substitute up to 24 units of graduate course work from other universities to fulfill the required 64 units of graduate credit subject to the approval of the department.

Pharmaceutical Economics and Policy track units
Satisfactory completion of the economic theory sequence with a grade point average of B or higher. At least one of the econometrics courses must be completed with a grade of B or higher:
ECON 401 Mathematical Methods in Economics 4
ECON 414 Introduction to Econometrics 4
ECON 500 Microeconomic Analysis and Policy 4
ECON 511 Econometric Methods 4
ECON 615 Applied Econometrics 4

Satisfactory completion of the pharmaceutical economics and policy sequence with an average grade of B or higher:
PMEP 509 Research Design 4
PMEP 519 Survey Research and Quality of Life Assessment 4
PMEP 529 Risk, Probabilities and Preferences 4
PMEP 538 Pharmaceutical Economics 4
PMEP 539 Economic Assessment of Medical Care 4
PMEP 549 Applied Pharmacoeconometrics 4
PMEP 698 Seminar in Pharmaceutical Economics and Policy 1, max 4

A minimum of three electives at the 500 level or higher from the School of Pharmacy’s Pharmaceutical Economics and Policy Program and from the departments of economics, mathematical statistics, biometry, epidemiology, public administration, computer science or other relevant fields are required.

Qualifying Exam Committee

The student will be assigned to a member of the graduate faculty who will serve as his or her temporary adviser until the formation of a qualifying exam committee. The student should consult the pharmaceutical economics and policy director of graduate studies on the appointment of a Ph.D. qualifying exam committee after taking the written qualifying examination. The chairman of the student’s Ph.D. qualifying exam committee advises the student on matters of curriculum and graduate opportunities. The qualifying exam committee comprises three to five members, at least one of whom can be from outside the department; at least two members must specialize in the student’s area of emphasis; and at least three of the members must be suitable for service on the student’s dissertation committee. The composition of all Ph.D. qualifying exam committees must be approved by the pharmaceutical economics and policy director of graduate studies. The student must form his or her qualifying exam committee soon after passing the departmental screening procedure.

Screening Procedure

The student’s progress will be reviewed after each semester and before registration for any additional course work to determine if progress has been satisfactory. The screening procedure may include satisfactory performance on written screening exams covering the major topics covered in the recommended coursework for each track.

Seminar Requirements

Every student is recommended to take and satisfactorily complete 4 units of research seminars chosen from PMEP 698 or the equivalent. At least one of these seminars must be related to the student’s major field and the same seminar may be taken more than once. Before completing the dissertation, it is recommended that the student present at least one original research paper in a seminar of his or her choice. This paper should typically consist of original results contained in the student’s dissertation.

Dissertation Proposal Preparation

The student is required to register for two units of PMEP 790 and write a research paper on a topic suitable for a dissertation. Typically, the chair of the student’s guidance committee directs this work. The resulting essay becomes part of the student’s written dissertation proposal which is presented and critiqued during the oral portion of the qualifying examination.

Qualifying Examination

Upon successful completion of the first two years of course work and grade requirements, including the passing of required screening procedures, the student takes a general written and oral examination on the chosen area of research emphasis after presenting a detailed written dissertation proposal. After passing these examinations, the student is admitted to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree.

Dissertation

After admission to candidacy, the student forms a dissertation committee comprising three faculty members, one of whom can be from an outside department. The chair of this committee is the dissertation supervisor. The student must register for PMEP 794 each semester, excluding summer sessions, until the dissertation and all other degree requirements are completed.

The student is expected to complete a dissertation based on original investigation. The dissertation must represent a significant contribution to knowledge and must be defended in an oral examination administered by the dissertation committee (see the section on Theses and Dissertations).

Student Teaching

Teaching experience is considered an integral part of the training of graduate students. As part of the general requirements for the Ph.D., all students are required to undergo training as an educator. This will include participating in seminars on educational techniques and hands-on teaching experiences through participation in didactic and small group teaching in the School of Pharmacy.

Doctor of Philosophy in Pharmaceutical Sciences

This program emphasizes basic as well as applied research in drug delivery and targeting, utilizing medicinal chemistry, computational chemistry, pharmaceutics, pharmacodynamics, molecular pharmacology, immunology and cell biology.

A minimum of 60 units is required for the Doctor of Philosophy degree. At least 24 units of course work are required at the 500-level or above, exclusive of seminar and directed research. The qualifying exam committee may require more than 24 units of course work. A minimum of 12 units is to be taken in courses in the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences and a minimum of 8 units must be taken in various related disciplines outside the department. The remaining 36 units may be fulfilled with other courses, directed research and dissertation.

Foreign Language Requirement

There is no formal foreign language requirement. However, an individual qualifying exam committee can require competency in a foreign language or some other research tool such as computer language, if this is relevant for the student’s area of research.

Qualifying Exam Committee

Upon admission, the student will be assigned to a member of the graduate faculty who will serve as his or her temporary adviser until a permanent adviser has been identified. The student’s program of study will be under the direction of a qualifying exam committee composed of at least five members, one of whom must be from outside the department granting the degree. The student should select a graduate adviser and qualifying exam committee no later than the third semester in residence.

Screening Procedure

The performance of each student will be evaluated no later than the end of the second semester of enrollment in the graduate program. This screening procedure is conducted by the student’s qualifying exam committee or, if a student has not selected his or her research adviser at that time, by the Graduate Review Committee of the department. The committee reviews thoroughly the student’s progress up to that point in various areas including course work, research interests and laboratory performance on his or her research project or laboratory rotations. If a performance deficiency is detected at that point by the committee, the student will be recommended to either take additional course work or transfer to the Master of Science program. Passing this screening procedure is prerequisite to continuation in the Ph.D. program.

Qualifying Examination

Students will be required to pass a comprehensive qualifying examination in major areas of the pharmaceutical sciences. The examination is administered by the qualifying exam committee and consists of two parts: a written examination and a written proposition outlining a research project, followed by an oral examination based on the proposition and questions dealing with the written examination.

All course and qualifying examination requirements for the Doctor of Philosophy must be completed within two and one half years after admission.

Dissertation

A dissertation based on original investigation is required. The research should make a contribution to science and should demonstrate the candidate’s scholarly advancement and competence to undertake independent research. An oral defense of the dissertation will be held after the candidate submits the final draft of the dissertation to the dissertation committee (see Theses and Dissertations).

Student Teaching

Teaching experience is considered an integral part of the training of graduate students. Thus, as part of the general requirements for the Ph.D., each student is required to participate in the teaching program of the School of Pharmacy.

Doctor of Philosophy in Molecular Pharmacology and Toxicology

This program emphasizes basic as well as applied research in various aspects of drug discovery and molecular and behavioral mechanisms of action. Research opportunities span investigations of fundamental molecular and cellular physiological mechanisms, including receptor activity, intracellular signaling and the regulation of gene expression, to the molecular bases of disease and aging, including avenues of pharmacological intervention.

A minimum of 60 units is required. At least 24 units of course work are required at the 500-level or above, exclusive of seminars and directed research. The qualifying exam committee may require more than 24 units of course work in some cases. The specific requirements will depend on the student’s background and research area and will be determined by the student’s adviser and advisory committee. A minimum of 12 units is to be taken in appropriate courses offered by the School of Pharmacy. The remaining 36 units may be fulfilled with other courses, directed research and dissertation. A maximum of 12 units can be transferred from graduate studies elsewhere.

Foreign Language Requirement

There is no formal language requirement. However, an individual qualifying exam committee can require competency in a foreign language or a computer language if it is relevant for the student’s area of research.

Qualifying Exam Committee

Upon admission, the student will be assigned to a member of the graduate faculty who will serve as his or her temporary adviser until a permanent adviser has been identified. The student’s program of study will be under the direction of a qualifying exam committee composed of at least five members, one of whom must be from outside the department. The student should select a graduate adviser and qualifying exam committee no later than the third semester in residence. The graduate affairs committee will serve as the qualifying exam committee until one is selected.

Screening Procedure

The performance of each student will be evaluated no later than the end of the second semester of enrollment in the graduate program. This screening procedure is conducted by the student’s qualifying exam committee or, if a student has not yet selected a qualifying exam committee, by the graduate affairs committee. The committee reviews the student’s progress to date in various areas including course work, research interests and laboratory performance on his or her research project or laboratory rotations. If a performance deficiency is determined, specific goals will be established that the student must fulfill to continue in the program. Passing this screening procedure is prerequisite to continuation in the Ph.D. program.

Qualifying Examination

Students will be required to pass a comprehensive qualifying examination in major areas of molecular pharmacology, including fundamental principals of molecular and cellular biology. The examination is administered by the qualifying exam committee and consists of two parts: a written examination administered to all students at the end of their second year of study and a written proposal outlining the dissertation goals, and its oral presentation and defense by the student to the qualifying exam committee. The examination process is conducted by the student’s advisory committee with oversight by the graduate affairs committee. The qualifying examination must be completed within three years after admission, unless an extension is obtained from the qualifying exam committee.

Annual Research Appraisal (ARA)

Beginning in the third year, each graduate student will meet with the qualifying exam committee and present a progress report on his or her research. Prior to the meeting the student will present a short written document describing significant experiments during the past year, problems and projected studies. This document is distributed to the committee members and is included in the student’s file. The oral ARA meeting is intended to be a working session between the student and the qualifying exam committee. Experimental results and problems are discussed in this context, as well as a research plan for the next year of work. A satisfactory ARA is required for each year in the graduate program.

Dissertation

A dissertation based on original investigation in a relevant scientific area is required for the Ph.D. The dissertation research should demonstrate the student’s ability to undertake independent research through planning, conducting and evaluating experiments. The dissertation research must represent a significant contribution to knowledge. A public oral defense of the dissertation will be held after the candidate submits the final draft of the dissertation to the dissertation committee, and it is approved by the graduate adviser and dissertation committee. For additional details, see Theses and Dissertations.

Student Teaching

Teaching experience is considered an integral part of the training of graduate students. As part of the general requirements for the Ph.D. degree, each student is required to participate in the teaching program of the School of Pharmacy.

Pharm.D./Juris Doctor

Admission Requirements

Admission to the dual Pharm.D./J.D. program is competitive, and involves meeting admission requirements and gaining acceptance to both the School of Pharmacy and the USC Gould School of Law. Students will not be given special consideration for admission to either program because they are applying for the dual degree. Students who have a baccalaureate degree may apply to the dual Pharm.D./J.D. degree program in two ways. First, they may apply at the time they submit their Pharm.D. application by concurrently submitting applications to both schools. Students who elect this approach must identify themselves on their Pharm.D. applications as potential dual Pharm.D./J.D. degree students. Students who are admitted to both schools will be offered admission to the dual degree contingent on passing all courses in their first year of the Pharm.D. with a minimum 3.0 GPA. Students pursuing the dual Pharm.D./J.D. degree must notify the law school in a timely fashion that they will be enrolling in the dual Pharm.D./J.D. degree program and will not matriculate at the law school until the following year. Students who are accepted by only one school may choose to attend that school but will not be eligible for the dual degree. Second, students can apply to the dual degree by submitting an application to the Gould School of Law during their first year of enrollment in the Pharm.D. program prior to the law school’s published application deadline. Students who elect this approach must apply through the School of Pharmacy. Students who are admitted to the law school using this approach would be offered admission to the dual degree contingent on passing all courses in their first year of the Pharm.D. with a minimum 3.0 GPA. See the admissions section of the School of Pharmacy and the Gould School of Law for specific requirements.

Pharm.D. Requirements

Dual degree students must successfully complete 144 units of Pharm.D. and acceptable J.D. units to receive the Pharm.D. degree. The 144 units must include 132 units of required and elective pharmacy course work plus 12 units of J.D. course work deemed acceptable to meet Pharm.D. elective requirements. Dual degree students should graduate with their Pharm.D. degrees at the completion of the first semester of the sixth academic year of the dual degree program. Students will be eligible to sit for the Pharmacy Board Exams after completion of the Pharm.D. degree requirements. However, dual degree students will not actually be awarded their Pharm.D. degrees until they complete requirements for both degrees.

Juris Doctor Requirements

Dual degree students must successfully complete 88 units of J.D. and acceptable Pharm.D. course work during the second to sixth years of the dual degree program to receive the J.D. degree. The 88 units must be composed of 76 units of J.D. course work, including satisfaction of the upper-division writing requirement and any other substantive requirements, plus 12 units of Pharm.D. course work deemed acceptable to meet J.D. elective requirements. No J.D. credit will be awarded for Pharm.D. course work completed prior to matriculation in the law school. Students cannot receive the J.D. degree under requirements for the dual degree program without prior or simultaneous completion of the Pharm.D. degree.

Both professions require passing a state board or bar exam to practice the respective professions. Neither of these professional doctoral degrees requires a thesis or comprehensive final exam.

Pharm.D./MBA Dual Degree Program

Responding to the growing demand on pharmacists to be knowledgeable in both science and business administration, the USC School of Pharmacy in 1988 helped pioneer an innovation in pharmaceutical education by offering this unique five-year dual degree program.

The Pharm.D./MBA dual degree program is offered cooperatively by the School of Pharmacy and the USC Marshall School of Business. Students must complete concurrently all requirements established by both schools for their respective degrees.

The program involves completion of the first year in the School of Pharmacy, the second in the Marshall School of Business, and then completion of the balance of both degrees during the third through fifth years. A total of 48 units must be completed in the Marshall School of Business.

First Year: Required Pharmacy School courses.

Second Year: Required MBA courses and graduate business electives.

Third to Fifth Years: 108 units of Pharmacy courses and graduate business electives sufficient to bring the total units completed in the Marshall School of Business to at least 48. Dual degree students may not count courses taken outside the Marshall School of Business toward the 48 units.

The Pharm.D. and the MBA are awarded simultaneously upon completion of the School of Pharmacy and the Marshall School of Business requirements.

Admission Requirements

Applicants to this program must have a baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university and should apply during their first year of pharmacy studies. Only students who have successfully completed one year in the School of Pharmacy will be considered for admission to the Marshall School of Business. See the Marshall School of Business for admission requirements.

Pharm.D./M.S., Gerontology

The emerging impact of the elderly on the health care system has created a need for health care providers who understand the unique needs of the elderly. As drug therapy remains the primary therapeutic option for chronic disease, the demand for prescription drugs will continue to rise. There is a demand for pharmacists who are equipped to meet the pharmaceutical care needs of this population. Geriatric pharmacy is recognized as a specialty, with board certification through the Commission for Certification in Geriatric Pharmacy. The Pharm.D./M.S., Gerontology program will provide extensive education and training in the unique health care needs of older adults. It will allow student pharmacists with a career interest in geriatrics or gerontology to work with health care planning or delivery organizations to develop and implement progressive pharmaceutical care programs for the elderly.

Application and Admission Requirements

Students who intend to pursue the dual Pharm.D./MSG degree must be accepted by both programs. This includes having completed a baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university with a minimum GPA of 3.0 and a minimum equivalent GRE score of 1000. Students will not be given special consideration for admission to either program because they are applying for the dual degree. Students may apply to the dual Pharm.D./M.S. degree program in two ways. First, they may apply at the time they submit their Pharm.D. application by concurrently submitting applications to both programs. Students who elect this approach must identify themselves on both applications as potential dual degree students. Students who are admitted to both programs will be offered admission to the Pharm.D. and will be offered admission to the dual degree program. Second, students can apply to the dual degree by submitting an application to the M.S. program during their first year of enrollment in the Pharm.D. prior to the M.S. published application deadline. Students who elect this approach must apply through the School of Pharmacy. Students admitted to the M.S. program using this approach will be offered admission to the dual degree contingent on passing all courses in their first year of the Pharm.D. with a minimum 3.0 GPA. Students accepted to the dual degree program must maintain a minimum 3.0 GPA in their Gerontology and Pharm.D. courses.

Recommended Program

First year: Required Year I Pharm.D. course work

Second year: Required Gerontology course work

Third year: Required Year II Pharm.D. course work

Fourth year: Required Year III Pharm.D. course work

Fifth year: Required Year IV Pharm.D. course work

Graduation Requirements

Students must complete all requirements for the Pharm.D. (see the Professional Degrees page) and M.S., Gerontology degrees as listed in the current catalogue with a minimum cumulative 3.0 GPA. The specific M.S. course requirements for the dual Pharm.D./M.S. degree are listed on the School of Gerontology Dual Degree Programs page.

Pharm.D./Master of Science, Global Medicine

The dual degree in Pharmacy and Global Medicine is designed for students who are interested in providing pharmaceutical care to underserved populations around the world. Students enrolled in this dual degree program will benefit from an advanced understanding of the role of, and issues surrounding, modern medicine in developing countries.

Requirements

Students must gain admission to and fulfill the degree requirements for both programs, which include 138 units for the Doctor of Pharmacy and 24 units for the M.S. in Global Medicine. Six units of GM elective units can be used towards the Pharm.D. elective requirement, and PHRD 503 and PHRD 504 substitute for MEDS 503 and MEDS 504.

Program Adaptation

Because MEDS 503 and MEDS 504, core requirements for the M.S. in Global Medicine program, cover the same material as PHRD 503 and PHRD 504, the Pharm.D./Global Medicine dual degree program substitutes PHRD 503 and PHRD 504 for MEDS 503 and MEDS 504 as core requirements for the dual degree.

Pharm.D./Master of Public Health

The School of Pharmacy and the Master of Public Health program, in recognition of the rapidly changing health care environment, and in response to the growing demand for pharmacists who are knowledgeable in both pharmacy and population-based health care issues, have developed a dual degree program. The joint Pharm.D./MPH degree will enable graduates to be more responsive to today’s health care needs and will provide training for pharmacists who seek to be agents of change within the profession and to assume leadership roles in the pharmacy field and in public health at the local, state and national levels.

Students who are enrolled in the School of Pharmacy must apply to the Master of Public Health program no later than January of their first year. All requirements for admission to the regular MPH program must also be fulfilled by dual degree applicants.

The Pharm.D./MPH program spans five years (four years of pharmacy school courses and one year of public health courses). Students begin the core MPH courses following the successful completion of the first year of pharmacy school. The last three years of the program are devoted to course work and the clinical rotations of the School of Pharmacy and to the completion of the elective courses and practicum (field experience) of the MPH program.

All students in the Pharm.D./MPH program must meet course requirements, grade point average requirements and program residency requirements of both programs. Students must have a cumulative GPA of 3.0 in the Pharm.D. curriculum and a 3.0 in the MPH curriculum to meet graduation requirements.

The Pharm.D. and the MPH degrees are awarded simultaneously upon completion of the School of Pharmacy and the Master of Public Health requirements.

Admission Requirements and Procedures

Students applying for the dual degree program must meet the respective admission requirements for each program. This includes having completed a baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university with a minimum GPA of 3.0 and having acceptable GRE and TOEFL or IELTS scores as applicable. Students will not be given special consideration for admission to either program because they are applying for the dual degree. Students may apply to the dual Pharm.D./MPH degree program in two ways. First, they may apply at the time they submit their Pharm.D. application by concurrently submitting applications to both programs. Students who elect this approach must identify themselves on both applications as potential dual degree students. Students who are admitted to both programs will be offered admission to the Pharm.D. and will be offered admission to the dual degree program contingent on passing all courses in their first year of the Pharm.D. with a minimum 3.0 GPA. Students who are accepted by only one program may choose to attend that program, but will not be eligible for the dual degree. Second, students can apply to the dual degree by submitting an application to the MPH program during their first year of enrollment in the Pharm.D. prior to the MPH published application deadline. Students who elect this approach must apply through the School of Pharmacy. Students admitted to the MPH program using this approach will be offered admission to the dual degree contingent on passing all courses in their first year of the Pharm.D. with a minimum 3.0 GPA.

Pharm.D./M.S., Regulatory Science

Regulatory science is that branch of knowledge which relates the regulatory and legal requirements of biomedical product development to the scientific testing and oversight needed to ensure product safety and efficacy. The program provides an opportunity for advanced preparation in the fields of regulatory affairs, quality assurance and clinical research. Students must complete concurrently all of the requirements established for the respective degrees. The program alternates the courses required for the Pharm.D. program during the fall and spring terms with courses required in summer terms for the M.S. program. Students will typically take courses in the summers of years two-four. Up to 12 appropriate units of course work from the Pharm.D. program can be applied toward the M.S. degree. The Pharm.D. and the M.S., Regulatory Science degrees will be awarded simultaneously upon completion of requirements for the two programs.

Admission Requirements and Procedures

Students applying for the dual degree program must meet the respective admission requirements for each program and must have a baccalaureate degree. Students will not be given special consideration for admission to either program because they are applying for the dual degree. Students may apply to the dual Pharm.D/M.S., Regulatory Science degree program in two ways. First, they may apply at the time they submit their Pharm.D. application by concurrently submitting applications to both programs. Students who elect this approach must identify themselves on both applications as potential dual degree students. Students who are admitted to both programs will be offered admission to the Pharm.D. and will be offered admission to the dual degree program contingent on passing all courses in their first year of the Pharm.D. with a minimum 3.0 GPA. Students who are accepted by only one program may choose to attend that program but will not be eligible for the dual degree. Second, students can apply to the dual degree by submitting an application to the M.S. in Regulatory Science program during their first or second year of enrollment in the Pharm.D. prior to the M.S. in Regulatory Science published application deadline. Students who elect this approach must apply through the School of Pharmacy. Students admitted to the M.S. in Regulatory Science using this approach will be offered admission to the dual degree contingent on passing all courses in their Pharm.D. studies with a minimum 3.0 GPA.

Pharm.D./Doctor of Philosophy

The Doctor of Pharmacy/Doctor of Philosophy (Pharm.D./Ph.D.) program is designed to permit qualified Pharm.D. students with a bachelor of science or equivalent degree to pursue research training in the pharmaceutical sciences and toxicology. A student accepted into the joint program must meet all requirements for the Pharm.D., as well as the requirements for the Ph.D. in the pharmaceutical sciences or toxicology sections listed in this catalogue. A maximum of 20 units from the Pharm.D. program may be credited toward the Ph.D. Up to 12 units of these Pharm.D. courses may, at the discretion of the student’s Ph.D. adviser, be counted toward the required 24 units of core course work.

Admission Procedure

Students applying for the dual degree program must meet the respective admission requirements for each program. This includes having completed a baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university with a minimum GPA of 3.0 and a minimum GRE score of 1000. Students will not be given special consideration for admission to either program because they are applying for the dual degree. Students may apply to the dual Pharm.D./Ph.D. degree program in two ways. First, they may apply at the time they submit their Pharm.D. application by concurrently submitting applications to both programs. Students who elect this approach must identify themselves on both applications as potential dual degree students. Students who are admitted to both programs will be offered admission to the Pharm.D. and will be offered admission to the dual degree program contingent on passing all courses in their first year of the Pharm.D. with a minimum 3.0 GPA. Students who are accepted by only one program may choose to attend that program but will not be eligible for the dual degree. Second, students can apply to the dual degree by submitting an application to one of the Ph.D. programs in the School of Pharmacy during their first two years of enrollment in the Pharm.D. prior to the respective published application deadlines for the Ph.D. programs. Students who elect this approach must apply through the Pharm.D. program. Students admitted to the Ph.D. program using this approach will be offered admission to the dual degree contingent on their having maintained a minimum 3.0 GPA in the Pharm.D. program.

Pharm.D./Graduate Certificate in Gerontology

This integrated program in pharmacy and gerontology prepares students with an interest in geriatric pharmacy to assume leadership roles at academic, administrative or policy levels within the profession. The program involves the completion of 16 units of core area courses in physiology, psychology, sociology and social policy aspects of aging offered by the USC Davis School of Gerontology. In addition, students are required to complete 8 units of approved elective courses in gerontology or geriatric pharmacy to be credited toward the requirements for the Pharm.D. and the Graduate Certificate in Gerontology. It is expected that the program can be successfully completed by candidates taking electives in geriatric pharmacy or gerontology during the regular semester and completing one core course in gerontology during each summer in the four year Pharm.D. program.

See the Davis School of Gerontology for complete requirements.

Admission Requirements

Students who have a baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university must submit separate applications to the School of Pharmacy and the Davis School of Gerontology. All requirements for admission to the regular Pharm.D. program must be fulfilled by the candidate. GRE scores are not required for admission to the certificate program.